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OSM22 is now going to be held in a fully online format. This page will be updated soon. For answers to your questions, go to our FAQ.

Innovative Sessions

IN01A Plastic litter pathways between land, freshwater and oceans

Date and Time: 2/28/2022, 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Location: Room 19

"Global estimates of plastic fluxes to the ocean rely upon modelling approaches, which predict large and increasing plastic inputs. Recent research suggests that these fluxes may be dominated by relatively small rivers, in contrast to results from prior studies. These discrepancies demonstrate the large uncertainties resulting from data gaps such as field quantification of floating and non-floating loading of different plastic size fractions, and knowledge gaps including an understanding of the complex transport processes in freshwater bodies as well as the fate of plastics in both freshwater and marine environments. This session will address research approaches ranging from modelling to field observations, resolving mass budgets, transport pathways and abundances of anthropogenic litter reaching marine environmental compartments. The content of this session will have a particular focus on plastic pollution across the whole size spectrum: from micro to macro litter.

Marine litter/debris and plastic pollution research is moving fast, which makes it challenging to track new developments and identify the scientific results that may best inform the implementation of regulatory frameworks to reduce litter loadings. The final goal of this session is to provide an up-to-date overview on the topic, which could be integrated into a science-policy report (standalone or as part of on-going activities, e.g. European Commission UNEP, G7, G20, etc.). We will organize a hybrid workshop as central activity enabling large scale participation to explore the state-of-the-art knowledge, open questions and potential next steps to fill the gaps in relation to four main discussion points:

  1. Sources and pathways of plastics from land into freshwater bodies
  2. Plastic loading estimates from rivers to the ocean
  3. Fate, sinks and hotspots distribution of litter in the ocean
  4. Measures to reduce plastic input to the ocean

Lead Organizer: Daniel González-Fernández, daniel.gonzalez@uca.es

IN01B Plastic litter pathways between land, freshwater and oceans

Date and Time: 2/28/2022, 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM
Location: Room 19

Lead Organizer: Daniel González-Fernández, daniel.gonzalez@uca.es

IN02A Small Islands, Big Ocean – Opening Session and Local Connections

Date and Time: 2/28/2022, 8:00 PM to 10:00 PM
Location: Room 19

Opening Session (20:00-21:00)
Chairs: Bob Richmond; Yim Golbuu
Through this innovative session we will celebrate our Pacific Ocean connections with a specific focus on connections across different spatial scales. From local to global. Small Islands, Big Oceans - ecological, physical and human connections in the Pacific will be opened by Nainoa Thompson to set the scene on connections among the islands, among the people, among generations and between people, resources and the ocean. This will be followed by a panelist discussion to further untangle and understand connections within the Pacific region - outlining where we have come from, where we are and where we should be navigating to.

Local Connections (21:00-22:00)
Chair: Rob Dunbar
Local connections between and among people and places lie at the core of how we experience, appreciate, study, and make use of the oceans. In this session we explore storytelling and oral history about the ocean as well as connections between fish, seabirds, and cetaceans and their environment as well as the people that share the marine environment. Speakers will also address benefits associated with population restorations and the creation of marine protected areas.

Lead Organizer: Louw Claassens, kyss.louw@gmail.com

IN02B Small Islands, Big Ocean – Regional Connections and Poster Session

Date and Time: 3/1/2022, 8:00 PM to 10:00 PM
Location: Room 22

Regional Connections (20:00-21:00)
Chair: Collin Closek
The Pacific Ocean is a vast seascape made up of a variety of regions connected by environmental, biological, and social factors. In this innovative session, presentations and discussions will explore these factors, while identifying common themes and lessons that can inform practices amongst the regions. Local representatives, practitioners, and scientists will convene to highlight traditional knowledge and modern insights from Pacific regions as well as opportunities for sustaining and managing healthy ecological, physical, and human connections.

Poster Session (21:00-22:00)
Chair: Valerie Brown; Louw Claassens
Learn about the ways Pacific Islanders connect with the ocean and marine resources and how science and technology can help them connect to even the deepest depths. This session will highlight recent work linking science and culture including student work on decolonizing research in Palau, corroborating wayfinding with satellite data, and leveraging diversity and community to map the seafloor. These longer poster presentations will explore the connections between science and culture and provide some insights to improve future marine conservation efforts.

Lead Organizer: Louw Claassens, kyss.louw@gmail.com

IN02C Small Islands, Big Ocean – Global Connections and Closing Session

Date and Time: 3/2/2022, 8:00 PM to 10:00 PM
Location: Room 22

Global Connections (20:00-21:00)
Chair: Chair: Fio Micheli
We all share one ocean and the ocean connects us all. In this session we will explore shared challenges, needs and opportunities to promote thriving oceans and people across the world. Presentations and discussion will address the current status of global ocean conservation and paths to scaling ocean protection for biodiversity and human benefit, innovation from data science, lessons from the global pandemic, and solutions from local and indigenous knowledge. The session will highlight connections across systems and scales and identify opportunities to harness knowledge, new technology, policy and conservation tools for global impact.

Closing Session (21:00-22:00)
Chairs: Atuatasi Lelei Peau; Yim Golbuu
Throughout this session, participants have learned about and discussed connections - connections between marine resources and humans as well as biological and physical science. More importantly, this session has highlighted how these connections extend across the oceans, linking our diverse islands together. In this final segment, participants will learn about a recent initiative between sanctuaries in Palau and American Samoa that illustrates how these important connections can be used to improve marine conservation. The session will end with breakout groups designed to discuss big ideas to build more connections and improve marine conservation at local, regional, and global scales. The feedback from these sessions will be synthesized and disseminated to encourage future marine conservation action.

Lead Organizer: Louw Claassens, kyss.louw@gmail.com

IN03A Indigenous Partnerships for a Sustainable Ocean

Date and Time: 3/3/2022, 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM
Location: Room 20

"As we begin the United Nations (UN) Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development, we have a collective, worldwide responsibility to transform our relationship to the marine environment, from one that emphasizes exploitation to one that embraces respect, responsibility, and sustainability; and to develop marine policy and management actions informed by the best research available. Coastal Indigenous peoples have stewarded the ocean for millennia, through complex, place-based cultures and governance systems that embrace ancestral, cultural, and spiritual connections. These governance systems, along with detailed, place-based Indigenous ocean knowledge systems, have supported sustainable coastal life for Indigenous peoples for time immemorial. The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) recognizes that Indigenous knowledge, cultures and traditional practices contribute to sustainable and equitable development of the environment, and yet this wisdom is underrepresented in mainstream research, decisions, policies, and actions for ocean sustainability.

In this full-day meeting, we will embark on an in-depth exploration of Indigenous Partnerships for a Sustainable Ocean. Through a diverse mix of in-person and virtual programming, we will examine Indigenous priorities for the UN Ocean Decade, successful Indigenous-academic partnerships, Indigenous approaches to data governance, and we will each advance our own partnership practice through breakouts and sharing opportunities. The meeting will build on the work started with the 53-member international Indigenous delegation to OceanObs’19 and continued in subsequent engagements, in which Indigenous delegates called on the global community to advance meaningful partnerships for ocean science in the Aha Honua Coastal Indigenous Peoples’ Declaration. Indigenous and non-Indigenous attendees will come together in the spirit of building strong pilina for a healthy, resilient, sustainable ocean future."

https://www.oceannetworks.ca/

Lead Organizer: Maia Hoeberechts, maiah@uvic.ca

IN03B Indigenous Partnerships for a Sustainable Ocean

Date and Time: 3/3/2022, 2:30 PM to 4:30 PM
Location: Room 20

Lead Organizer: Maia Hoeberechts, maiah@uvic.ca

IN04A Winds of Change: Integrating Social, Biological, and Physical Sciences in Off-Shore Energy Development

Date and Time: 3/4/2022, 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Location: Room 20

"Offshore wind energy development is a priority of ocean policy in many parts of the world, including Europe and the United States, as one alternative to our reliance on fossil fuels. Thus far, the vast majority of research on off-shore wind farms has centered on the environmental impacts of development, rather than the political, economic, social, and cultural changes that will be experienced by coastal communities.

The goal of our Innovative Session is to bring together an transdisciplinary group of marine scientists with expertise in ecology, biology, physical processes, and sociology to (1) introduce participants to the current state of social science research related to offshore wind energy development, (2) discuss the successes and challenges of several specific development projects and (3) generate new ideas about the unique socioeconomic impacts development may have on coastal communities in different parts of the world.

We will achieve these goals using several engaging presentation formats. Using our team’s Social Science Research Agenda as a baseline for conversation, we will use 7-minute lighting talks to set the context for the session, followed by a moderated discussion around stakeholder engagement in the development of off-shore wind farms, that will highlight different engagement strategies that were successful or not. Finally, participants will join breakout sessions to share their experience with or ideas about quantifying socioeconomic impacts of development on coastal communities, including tourism, fisheries, aquaculture, and economic development.

Our session will embody OSM’s theme of “Come Together and Connect” by bringing together biophysical scientists and social scientists to enhance understanding of the social sciences, foster community, and seed future collaborations between in-person and virtual participants, inviting them to contribute to the development of a collective future research agenda."

Lead Organizer: Theresa Burnham, theresa.burnham@maine.edu

IN04B Winds of Change: Integrating Social, Biological, and Physical Sciences in Off-Shore Energy Development

Date and Time: 3/4/2022, 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM
Location: Room 20

Lead Organizer: Theresa Burnham, theresa.burnham@maine.edu

IN05 Exploring the Science-Technology-Innovation Interface for the Ocean Decade

Date and Time: 3/3/2022, 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM
Location: Room 21

"To achieve its vision of ‘the science we need for the ocean we want’, the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development (2021-2030) (‘Ocean Decade’) seeks to create a paradigm shift in ocean knowledge and to provide a framework to catalyze transformative ocean science solutions, thereby connecting people and the ocean. One of the central tenets of the Ocean Decade is to move beyond ‘business as usual’ in ocean science. Technology and innovation have a crucial role to play in both informing research directions and in moving from science to solutions. Technological innovation that is accessible, relevant and scalable is necessary for achieving the vision of the Ocean Decade and, if leveraged in a timely manner, will lead to greater impacts at scale.

This 2-hour Innovative Session will introduce the work of the new UN Decade of Ocean Science Technology & Innovation Advisory Working Group and host multiple parallel breakout workshops to discuss and identify barriers and opportunities on: (1) commercially available marine technologies that have yet to be implemented broadly for scientific research and observation; (2) novel marine technologies and innovative approaches to research that are under development and the mechanisms through which those could move to widespread use; (3) a future-looking imagining of scientific research areas over the next 10 years identified by participants for which technology does not yet exist; and, (4) enabling conditions for technological innovation and transfer in support of equitable access, sustainable solutions and capacity building and exchange in particular as it relates to the Global South, SIDS and LDCs. This hybrid session will allow for inclusive and diverse participation, in alignment with the goals of the Ocean Decade. These conversations will inform the report of the Technology & Innovation Advisory Working Group to the UN Ocean Decade Board as it determines the next call(s) for Ocean Decade Actions."

https://www.oceandecade.org

Lead Organizer: Jyotika Virmani, jyotika@schmidtocean.org

IN06A The Ocean Knowledge Action Network -- Transforming “Ocean Science Co-Creation” for Sustainable Development

Date and Time: 2/28/2022, 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM
Location: Room 21

"The UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development calls for a transformation in how ocean science is designed, produced, and delivered to maximize its usefulness to achieve sustainable development and a healthy and resilient ocean. This transformation goes beyond traditional stakeholder involvement and is built on the concept of ""science co-creation"" in which scientists work directly with end users. The Ocean Knowledge Action Network (Ocean KAN) was created to facilitate this co-creation.

This session will focus on transformative actions “Decade Programmes” are undertaking to bring stakeholders into the scientific process. “Decade Programme” partners and the Ocean KAN will hold pre-conference sessions to highlight stakeholder needs and involvement in the design of “Decade” science. At OSM, we will hold a Hybrid event featuring the leads of these Decade Programmes along with remote feeds from social scientists and stakeholders off-site and in the field.

Lead Organizer: Stella Alexandroff, Ocean Knowledge Action Network, stella@oceankan.org

IN07A Wave Energy in Hawaii’s Future

Date and Time: 3/1/2022, 2:30 PM to 4:30 PM
Location: Room 19

THIS WORKSHOP WILL TAKE PLACE OVER TWO DAYS. ATTENDING BOTH DAYS IS PREFERRED

This interactive session will use online breakout sessions, engaging marine scientists to sustainably and efficiently extract power from waves in Hawaii. We will bring together physical oceanographers, marine mammal, fish and sea turtle biologists, benthic ecologists, hydrodynamic modelers, oceanographic sensor developers and users, and marine planners.

Brief presentations will orient the participants to deploying a large wave farm off the north coast of Oahu. The presenters will indicate the need to: characterize the available wave resource; assess potential effects of the wave farm on marine animals and habitats; develop effective sensor systems and monitoring tools to understand potential physical and biological effects; and model changes in benthic habitats, pelagic populations, and the wave climate. The presenters will show photographs and drawings of wave devices and wave farms, list the species of interest in Hawaii, delineate the seafloor and reefs in the area of the wave farm, and present the wave regime of the region.

The facilitated breakout groups will address the following steps in developing a wave farm north of Oahu:

  • Characterize physical and biological environments to inform wave farm design
  • Determine effects of the wave farm on the marine environment;
  • Develop a monitoring system to determine how wave farm performance and potential effects on the environment; and
  • Assess the long-term cumulative effects of the wave farm and other anthropogenic activities, in the face of climate change.

Each breakout group will report findings. A general discussion on the efficacy and sustainability of the proposed solutions will round out the session. Notes from the session will be sent to all participants and they will be invited to join the marine energy community in following the development of marine energy in tropical and temperate waters of the world.

Lead Organizer: Andrea Copping, andrea.copping@pnnl.gov

IN07B Wave Energy in Hawaii’s Future

Date and Time: 3/2/2022, 2:30 PM to 4:30 PM
Location: Room 19

Lead Organizer: Andrea Copping, andrea.copping@pnnl.gov

IN08A Open Ocean Science

Date and Time: 3/3/2022, 2:30 PM to 4:30 PM
Location: Room 19

"Advances in data, software, and computing are enabling transformational, interdisciplinary science, and changing the realm of possible investigations. Open science communities can advance science and inclusivity simultaneously. Practically, many scientists who wish to move towards more openness and reproducibility struggle to understand what resources are available to enable open and reproducible science. This session seeks to connect the community of open data, open source software, open science platforms, open access, and open science practitioners, across all ocean science disciplines.

This is a full-day (6-hour) innovative session with four 1-hour long sessions, highlighting how and why to engage in reproducible, ethical, inclusive and collaborative data science and a single 2-hour mini-hackathon session. Each 1-hour session is organized around different topics pertinent to the ocean data science community, featuring combinations of oral presentations, panel discussions, and hands-on workshops. The 2-hour mini-hackathon will focus on applying this knowledge to put many useful ocean science datasets on the cloud using the newly developed Pangeo-Forge.

This session will take place as a hybrid event, welcoming both in-person and virtual attendees. Speakers will provide links to demonstrations and tutorials (where possible) and communication will be through a Slack workspace. Virtual participants can ‘chat’ questions during each session, enabling their participation alongside in-person attendees. For all sessions, we may break into small group discussions, both in person and via Zoom Breakout rooms for virtual participants, to tailor to the needs and skill levels of attendees.

Attendees of all levels and backgrounds are invited to attend this innovative session. The goal of this session is to inform and excite members of the ocean science community about open science practices, and to provide valuable hands-on training with several open-source tools."

https://pangeo.io

Lead Organizer: Paige Martin, pmartin@ldeo.columbia.edu

IN08B Open Ocean Science

Date and Time: 3/4/2022, 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Location: Room 19

Lead Organizer: Paige Martin, pmartin@ldeo.columbia.edu

IN08C Open Ocean Science

Date and Time: 3/4/2022, 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM
Location: Room 19

Lead Organizer: Paige Martin, pmartin@ldeo.columbia.edu

IN09A Innovations and Integrations of Alternate Platforms and Sensors for Ecosystem Understanding

Date and Time: 3/3/2022, 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Location: Room 19

"Science and technology have strong pilina as there is no progress or innovation in one without the other. As the aperture of aquatic science expands, the need for technological integration of data acquisition platforms and sensors continues to increase. Autonomous, mobile, stationary, surface, and subsurface platforms deployed for extended periods in extreme environments are now supplementing or supplanting traditional surface vessel efforts. Integrated data streams from these sensor packages are used to census resources, monitor change, or decipher interactions among biological, biogeochemical, and physical processes over a range of spatial and temporal scales.

This session aims to identify common challenges and actionable approaches to acquire and integrate empirical data from alternate platforms for synthetic ecosystem understanding. Contributions are encouraged from scientists across all AGU, ASLO, and TOS disciplines. Live, virtual, and/or recorded lightning talks will address science goals, technical challenge(s), and approaches to data acquisition and synthesis. Live and virtual facilitated breakout groups will identify technological gaps and logical next steps for each thematic session. Participation by government and grant agency program managers will provide programmatic context and receive community priorities in a final panel discussion. Anticipated benefits include networking across disciplines, technological community creation, and scientific information dissemination. A white paper that summarizes identified challenges and actionable solutions will be compiled from session contributions and disseminated among relevant government agencies and potential funding sources."

Lead Organizer: John Horne, jhorne@uw.edu

IN09B Innovations and Integrations of Alternate Platforms and Sensors for Ecosystem Understanding

Date and Time: 3/3/2022, 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM
Location: Room 19

Lead Organizer: John Horne, jhorne@uw.edu

IN11A Historical Resonance in the Atlantic: Implications for Black Marine Scientists

Date and Time: 2/28/2022, 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Location: Room 20

The documentary film Can We Talk? Difficult Conversations with Underrepresented People of Color: Sense of Belonging in STEM was screened at the Ocean Sciences 2020 conference, initiating a discussion about the effects of systemic racism and bias in the ocean science community. The current proposed 2021 session will continue this conversation by screening content that centers the perspective of Black marine researchers, historians, and literary scholars on the ocean sciences. Central to this discussion will be the meaning, materiality, and memory of the Atlantic Ocean. The film documents how the Atlantic Slave Trade and subsequent forms of racial exclusion on American coastlines have influenced the way Black marine scientists think about and do their work. The session will encourage us to think about whether descendants of the slave trade may avoid ocean research for these reasons; and to consider how the knowledge and awareness of maritime genocide inspires a different set of ethics and or research sensibilities for those who do conduct ocean research. Does memory guide us differently in the practice of our science? This session will include a short screening of a segment from Kendall Moore’s latest film Decolonizing Science, followed by a panel discussion.

https://www.kendallmooredocfilms.com/

Lead Organizer: Kendall Moore, kendallmoore@uri.edu

IN11B Historical Resonance in the Atlantic: Implications for Black Marine Scientists

Date and Time: 2/28/2022, 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM
Location: Room 20

Lead Organizer: Kendall Moore, kendallmoore@uri.edu

IN12 Ocean #SciArt: What can ocean scientists and artists learn by working together?

Date and Time: 3/2/2022, 2:30 PM to 4:30 PM
Location: Room 21

"Artist residencies within scientific institutions are nothing new. But they have often been implemented in a way that assumes the artist will merely be watching, learning, interpreting science, rather than including the artist in the active process of scientific discovery. In this session, we will consider this second, less-travelled path, loosely defined as transdisciplinary research.

In transdisciplinary research, responses to research questions can move freely between various modalities emerging from the collaborator’s disciplinary and cultural practices. These multimodal approaches often lead to highly innovative solutions, but also require participants to deepen their listening practice and invoke a sense willingness to see their assumptions challenged and certainties displaced.

Drawing on our experiences with the Ocean Memory Project and other ocean-related Art-Science collaborations, this session will seek to bring together participants from any number of disciplines, cultures and points of view, to explore ways in which such multiplicity can be convened within a research framework, helping to broaden potential responses to a variety of challenges.

The session will involve both presentation, discussion, and hands-on activities — such as research object modelling techniques (3D and 4D modelling) — drawing from the toolkits of art, music, science, social science and the humanities to propose a hybrid and consensual model for collaboration."

https://oceanmemoryproject.com

Lead Organizer: Dwight Owens, dwowens@uvic.ca

IN13 Ocean-based CDR: Opportunities and Challenges

Date and Time: 2/28/2022, 2:30 PM to 4:30 PM
Location: Room 19

"This Innovative Session will actively engage a diverse community in discussions on opportunities and challenges associated with the establishment of R&D programs that advance ocean-based carbon dioxide removal (CDR).

To set the stage, the session will begin with a short presentation (15 minutes) on the newly-released National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine report outlining research strategies for advancing ocean-based CDR and sequestration. This study was funded by the ClimateWorks Foundation to closely examine six mechanisms for CDR (ecosystem recovery, seaweed cultivation, nutrient fertilization, artificial upwelling and downwelling, ocean alkalinity enhancement, and electrochemistry) and provide a path forward for R&D of the promising approaches. At least one day in advance of the session, all registrants will receive a digital copy of the report, and a link to join the interactive tool Slido to start populating the virtual tool with questions or comments for the study committee.

Following this introduction, the next part of the session will be virtual presenters who are either early ocean-based CDR research adopters or practitioners in each of the six ocean-based CDR solutions. Each will showcase (5 minutes each) their research or emerging businesses. These presentations will focus on rich visual content (e.g. their experiment, kelp farms, recovery successes) and highlight one aspect of the report findings that could advance their initiative.

Audience interaction will start with the moderators addressing advance questions for the committee from Slido, followed by real-time in person and Slido Q&A.

This session will allow 2022 Ocean Sciences participants, from both inside and outside the Ocean-CDR community to engage in discussions on some the critical cross-sector challenges that need to be overcome if the ocean becomes a solution, across multiple approaches, to enhance uptake of carbon as part of a larger climate mitigation strategy."

https://www.nationalacademies.org/our-work/a-research-strategy-for-ocean-carbon-dioxide-removal-and-sequestration

Lead Organizer: Kelly Oskvig, koskvig@nas.edu

IN14A Developing social indicators of resilience and vulnerability in coastal communities

Date and Time: 3/4/2022, 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Location: Room 21

"Monitoring biological populations alone is not enough to adequately prepare for future socioeconomic and environmental changes to working waterfronts and coastal communities around the world. Researchers have begun to develop social indicators of coastal community resilience and vulnerability by first identifying variables connected to resilience/vulnerability and then identifying quantitative indices from secondary data. However, these secondary data sources are often temporally and spatially insensitive (i.e., at the scale of decades or nations, respectively) and therefore unable to provide specific, timely information to fishers, managers, or other coastal community members as they navigate changing conditions. By bringing together a geographically diverse set of biological oceanographers, marine ecologists, and coastal policymakers to share the secondary data sources available and social indicators present at local scales, our session will embody the spirit of pilina and push forward this important research.

Our hybrid Innovative Session will begin with a keynote address to introduce participants to the current state of social indicators research, highlighting knowledge gaps and collaborative opportunities. Next, we will separate participants into breakout groups based on their regional expertise and lead a brainstorming exercise to compile the available data sources and social indicators that are relevant in each region. Finally, we will reconvene and each group will present the results of the brainstorming exercise, culminating in the creation of a shared, living document that contextualizes the publicly available data and culturally competent social indicators identified by our participants. This output will serve as a centralized public repository of researchers developing local social indicators and provide a roadmap of relevant data and indicators for future projects and collaborations."

Lead Organizer: Theresa Burnham, theresa.burnham@maine.edu

IN14B Developing social indicators of resilience and vulnerability in coastal communities

Date and Time: 3/4/2022, 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM
Location: Room 21

Lead Organizer: Theresa Burnham, theresa.burnham@maine.edu

IN15 Teaching concrete concepts in a virtual world: New modalities for engaging undergraduates in ocean sciences

Date and Time: 3/3/2022, 9:00 AM to 11:00 AM
Location: Room 20

"How do you teach undergraduate students about salinity and density while they are stuck at home? How can you teach about the body systems of squid without dissections and still provide a ""hands-on"" experience? The arrival of the Covid-19 pandemic shuttered colleges around the world and forced us all to quickly develop remote learning oppoturnities for our students. Now many institutions are returning to fully face-to-face instruction, while others are opting to continue to provide a range of instructional modalities (e.g. fully online and asychronous, remote/semi-synchronous over Zoom, and hybrid classes with face-to-face labs and remote lectures). And so which of the many labs, lectures, and activities that you developed on the fly during the pandemic should you integrate into these new course modalities? And what can you do to make them better?

Participants in this innovative session may be physically present in Honolulu or may attend virtually. All will have the opportunity to explore a number of innovative online tools that can be used in synchronous and asynchronous courses. In break-out groups, we will apply these tools to a series of common concepts in ocean science classes, such as ocean acidification, evolution in changing ocean environments, paleoclimate, plastic pollution and bioaccumulation, and waves and tides, to develop concrete activities for students to explore in remote settings. At the end of the session, participants will present their work to the whole group in lightening talks. Through this process, participants will discern the qualities that make an activity engaging, informative, and viable for undergraduates. Participants will work in groups that are physically and virtually present and will leave this session with at least one new virtual learning activity, access to the other activities created during the session, a new network of colleagues, and an understanding of which tools work best in particular remote environments."

Lead Organizer: Jennifer Johns, jennifer.johns@chemeketa.edu

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