About AGU

American Geophysical Union The American Geophysical Union supports 130,000 enthusiasts to experts worldwide in Earth and space sciences.

Through broad and inclusive partnerships, AGU aims to advance discovery and solution science that accelerate knowledge and create solutions that are ethical, unbiased and respectful of communities and their values. Our programs include serving as a scholarly publisher, convening virtual and in-person events and providing career support. We live our values in everything we do, such as our net zero energy renovated building in Washington, D.C. and our Ethics and Equity Center, which fosters a diverse and inclusive geoscience community to ensure responsible conduct.

Charged with exploring three fourths of the planet, AGU's Ocean Sciences Section is necessarily large and inclusive. The section welcomes members whose primary interests are marine related, regardless of discipline. It recently re-organized into four subsections that provide a clearer focus for participation in AGU activities: biological oceanography, marine geochemistry, marine geology and geophysics, and physical oceanography. Across these disciplines, members are academic and research scientists, engineers, policy-makers, and administrators. Members study processes in environments ranging from the coast through the open ocean, and they develop and use a wide range of highly technical instrumentation ranging from remote sensors to autonomous devices to ship-related sampling gear. The oceans are important for our quality of life, its fisheries and mineral resources, for transport, and its role in the climate system. Some of the exciting research emerging is related to the role of the oceans in the climate system. Researchers are studying the ocean's involvement in the exchange of heat, water vapor, and momentum; sequestering heat at depth; and exchange and cycling of greenhouse gases and other biogeochemically important compounds. Because of its broad focus - and because the ocean is such a vital part of the Earth system - the Section encourages dialogue with interdisciplinary scientists at the Spring and Fall Meetings and the biennial Ocean Sciences Meeting, which is jointly organized with other societies concerned with studying marine problems.

AGU was established in 1919 by the National Research Council and operated as an unincorporated affiliate of the National Academy of Sciences for more than 50 years. We were independently incorporated in 1972.

Learn more at https://www.agu.org.

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