Workshops and Town Halls

The organizers of the meeting encourage town hall meetings, workshops or other auxiliary meetings planned in conjunction with the 2019 Aquatic Sciences Meeting. The online application form is now closed. If you are interested in organizing a meeting or event that you are planning, please contact Lynda West at lyndaw@sgmeet.com

These events should be planned during lunch or possibly in the evening. Meeting room space will be complimentary as long as there are rooms available. All other costs will not be covered. Even if space is not available at the convention center, you may still organize your own meeting or activity at an alternative location.

Workshops and Town Halls scheduled to Date

Aquatic Science Education and Outreach Workshop
Date: Sunday, 24 February 2019
Time: 13:00 to 17:00
Location: Room 208 C

This workshop will focus on helping participants develop ideas for effective education and outreach activities based on their research. Featuring active, hands-on learning, small group discussions, and guided inquiry, this workshop will include short presentations on exemplary projects in formal and informal education designed for K-12, undergraduate, graduate, and public audiences to stimulate ideas.  Discussions of how people learn, how to assess the effectiveness of outreach activities, and how to develop projects that meet specific goals will help support project development. Participants are welcome to bring ideas that they would like to develop and share, and for which they would like to receive feedback. Organized by Cynthia Hagley (University of Minnesota, Duluth; chagley@d.umn.edu) and Bob Chen (University of Massachusetts Boston; bob.chen@umb.edu) Workshop is open to all attendees; walk-ins are welcome. While there is no need to register for this workshop, if you have any questions, please do not hesitate to email the organizers.

LOREX Orientation Workshop (This is an invitation-only event.)
Date: Sunday, 24 February 2019
Time: 14:00 to 18:00
Location: Room 208 AB

The Limnology and Oceanography Research Exchange (LOREX) program Orientation Workshop will create a space for the principal investigators to provide an overview of the LOREX program, provide time for participants to ask questions and express concerns, and create a space for LOREX participants to meet each other at the beginning of the meeting. Additionally, LOREX participants will learn how to integrate improv skills to facilitate international collaboration and communicate their science more effectively from improv actor, Brian Palermo. Attendance is limited to LOREX program participants and collaborators. Tentative agenda follows:

14:00 – 14:30     Welcome, Personnel Introductions, Program Expectations
14:30 – 16:00     Improv to Improve Collaboration with Brian Palermo
16:00 – 16:30     Q&A with full group including former IRES students
16:30 – 17:00     Next Steps for the Program
17:00 – 17:45     Breakout sessions by site to give hosts and students an opportunity to discuss site-specific concerns/issues
17:45 – 18:00     Evaluation questionnaire

For more information about this event, please contact: Adrienne Sponberg at sponberg@aslo.org

The Science of Science Communication Workshop
Date: Sunday, 24 February  2019
Time: 08:00 to 17:00
Location: Room 103 A

Science communication is a diverse and transdisciplinary field that has been gaining traction in recent years. In tandem, the expectation that scientists become proficient at science communication to all audiences is rising. Early career scientists (here defined as undergraduate students, graduate students and those within a few years of graduation from a graduate degree program) are particularly in need of effective science communication skills as they are either beginning their science career at the undergraduate level or developing their scientific specialty at the graduate level. In order to bridge the gap between the scientific and public audiences, this workshop will focus on oral and visual communication skills. To register for this event, please sign up for free at http://signup.com/go/oQqqOpo. If you would like more information, you can contact: Hayley Schiebel at hayley.schiebel@gmail.com

Make Your Science Communication More Effective Workshop
Date: Sunday, 24 February 2019
Time: 10:00 to 13:00
Location: Room 101

The Science Communication Lab in Puerto Rico will help you improve your communications skills so you can present your work more effectively.  The Hollywood entertainment industry has traditionally been the source of both innovation and perfection of narrative elements. The same approach is applicable to the communication of science to all audiences, from the general public to fellow academics.  Communications expert, Brian Palermo, will return to ASLO to lead the 2019 workshop. He is a professional actor and improv instructor (e.g., The Social Network, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, the Groundlings Theatre, Los Angeles).  It will build on the success of previous workshops by Palermo (2012, 2013, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018) also organized by Jonathan Sharp (University of Delaware) and Adrienne Sponberg (ASLO). There will be a 3-hour workshop on Sunday (10:00-13:00) before the opening of the meeting. The workshop is free and is open to all, but participants must register by 23 February at http://bit.ly/19Palermo. It will be a hands-on workshop with interaction between Palermo and audience members. Financial support for this workshop has been received from the Ocean Sciences Division of the US National Science Foundation. For more information about this event, please contact: Adrienne Sponberg at sponberg@aslo.org

WATER MARKS: Where Art Meets Science 
Date: Daily - Monday, 25 February, through Friday, 1 March 2019
Time: 12:00 to 14:30
Location: Room 206

How do artists embrace scientific concerns and translate them across diverse art forms? How can both disciplines benefit from an increased exchange of practices? What new insights and methods might we discover together? Water Marks activities will be facilitated by six artists from across the Americas and Puerto Rico during the 2019 ASLO Winter Conference. Together artists and scientists will be exploring the materials and methods that artists use to investigate scientific themes focused on water. You will also be introduced to the work of local artists, providing you with a personalized vision of environmental challenges on the island. Through a week-long series of Special Sessions, attendees can choose from a wide variety of hands-on activities including: media documentation using cellphone cameras and the 360 camera;  guided explorations of the environment through movement; sound composition; and the creation of ephemeral installations using materials sourced from the area. Our goal is to cultivate greater understanding and collaboration between artists and scientists regarding aquatic environments, both during the conference and into the future. Sessions will be scheduled on and off-site during lunch hours and after-conference hours and in order to avoid competition with the science sessions. No prior skills are required. Enjoyment guaranteed. If you have questions about this event, please contact the workshop organizers, Lauren Elder (lelderoakland@gmail.com) or Elizabeth Miller (elizabeth.miller@concordia.ca).

Teaching Introductory Aquatic Sciences Courses Workshop

Date: Monday, 25 February 2019
Time: 12:30 to 14:00
Location: Room 101

Introductory aquatic and environmental science courses provide an excellent opportunity to prepare both majors and non-majors for thinking about some of the largest issues facing society such as climate change and energy needs. Introductory courses can also serve to recruit students from highly diverse backgrounds into the field and/or to engage students of all majors to think deeply about environmental issues such as climate change. Often, these courses are large (>50 students). This workshop will provide strategies to overcome some of the challenges of these large introductory courses while making your teaching engaging, relevant, and effective for all students. A special emphasis is placed on a few big concepts that can help organize examples and knowledge for students to grapple with future ocean and environmental issues.  Come ready to share ideas, to think actively about teaching and learning, and to discuss what works and why. For more information about this event, please contact: Robert Chen at bob.chen@umb.edu

Improv to Improve International Collaborations Workshop
Date: Monday, 25 February 2019
Time: 12:30 to 14:00
Location: Room 102

Initiating and maintaining collaborative research programs can be daunting. The additional challenges inherent to international research (e.g., language and cultural differences) can stop many potentially fruitful collaborations before they even begin. Join communication expert, actor, and improv comedy instructor, Brian Palermo, to learn how Hollywood narrative structure can help you initiate research collaborations and how Improv training can improve communication across language and cultural barriers. For more information about this event, please contact: Adrienne Sponberg at asponberg@aslo.org

FlowCam Software Workshop
Date: Monday, 25 February 2019
Time: 12:30 to 14:00
Location: Room 103 A

A demonstration of the newly released FlowCam software – VisualSpreadsheet 5.0.  VisualSpreadsheet 5.0 allows the user to analyze multiple runs, enabling the comparison and contrast of data sets. “5.0” is a useful tool for longitudinal studies, time-series analyses, trend spotting, etc.  The new FlowCam 8400 will be demonstrated as well.  The workshop is geared towards existing users of the FlowCam.

For more information about this event, please contact: Harry Nelson at harry.nelson@fluidimaging.com or Frances Buerkens at frances.buerkens@fluidimaging.com

Interdisciplinary Presentations Workshop
Date: Tuesday, 26 February 2019
Time: 12:30 to 14:00
Location: Room 102

Limnology and Oceanography as multi-disciplinary sciences, combine aspects of physics, chemistry, biology, and geology; and often include socio-economics.  At a meeting like this one, you could make a narrow-scope presentation, without setting up the reason for the project, using specialized terminology, and not explaining the relevance of your results. That may be fine for a small number of specialty peers.  However, if you want to reach and appeal to a broader interdisciplinary audience, you need another approach. This workshop will address things to make presentations more engaging and appealing to those outside your specialty as well as those in your narrow research area. This workshop is open to all. It is organized by Jonathan Sharp (University of Delaware) and Adrienne Sponberg (ASLO); using the skills of communications expert, Brian Palermo (a professional actor and improv instructor; e.g., The Social Network, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, the Groundlings Theatre, Los Angeles).  We will attend a few presentations early in the 2019 Puerto Rico ASLO Aquatic Sciences Meeting.  At the workshop, we will discuss specialty presentations in general, with some specific reference to what we saw in those talks. The main goal is to illustrate how to make improvements to transform a specialty presentation into one that is memorable and compelling to a broad interdisciplinary audience.  Similar workshops have been conducted with help from Palermo in 2013, 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018. For more information about this event, please contact: Jonathan Sharp at jsharp@udel.edu

Elements of a Teaching Philosophy Statement Workshop
Date: Tuesday, 26 February 2019
Time: 12:30 to 14:00
Location: Room 208 C

Seeking a career in academia – in teaching, research, or both? Regardless of your academic career path, chances are, you will need to include a teaching philosophy statement in your application package. In this workshop we will cover the elements of a good teaching philosophy statement and how to customize statements to match job descriptions and get your application noticed. Participants will leave the workshop prepared to write their own teaching philosophy statement. For more information about this event, please contact: Kylla Benes at kylla.benes@umontana.edu. Please register for the event online at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/QWGZ237

Introducing an Ocean Protein Portal Town Hall
Date: Tuesday, 26 February 2019
Time: 12:30 to 14:00
Location: Room 204

We are announcing the release of the Ocean Protein Portal, an NSF EarthCube Prototype website that allows scientists to explore ocean metaproteomic datasets for research purposes. The event will include a description and demo of the portal, followed by a Q&A period. For more information about this event, please contact: Mak Saito at msaito@whoi.edu

Real-time QC of pH Data Workshop
Date: Tuesday, 26 February 2019
Time: 12:30 to 14:00
Location: Room 209 C

The U.S. IOOS Quality Assurance / Quality Control of Real-Time Oceanographic Data (QARTOD) will kick off the creation of a RT QC manual for pH observations. All are invited to this workshop to discuss the methods and challenges involved, identify tests to employ, and determine the scope of this manual. For more information about this event, please contact: Mark Bushnell at mark.bushnell@noaa.gov

Research Collaboration Across Borders Panel Discussion
Date: Tuesday, 26 February 2019
Time: 12:30 to 14:00
Location: Room 101

As challenges in the aquatic sciences become more global in nature, international research collaborations are increasingly prevalent, with over 35% of worldwide publications produced as a result of international partnerships. Join a panel of experts (TBA) that have successfully led international collaborations to discuss the unique set of challenges associated with conducting research internationally. Discussion topics will include identifying and contacting potential collaborators, strengthening ongoing collaborations, addressing language and cultural differences, and determining project goals, timelines, authorship, and logistics for fruitful collaborations. For more information about this event, please contact: Adrienne Sponberg at sponberg@aslo.org

Limnology & Oceanography WikiWorkshop
Date: Wednesday, 27 February 2019
Time: 12:30 to 14:00
Location:  Room 204

Wikipedia is among the most common ways people interact with information on the internet. When googling a search term, the Wikipedia article is generally the first hit and most read result, but many Limnology- and Oceanography-related Wikipedia articles are short and/or of low-quality. By improving the quality of Wikipedia articles in our research fields, we can improve general understanding and appreciation of Limnology and Oceanography. The Ecological Dissertations in the Aquatic Sciences (ECO-DAS) 2018 working group has launched an initiative to improve Wikipedia articles related to Limnology and Oceanography and we would like to expand this initiative to the larger ASLO community. The Limnology & Oceanography WikiWorkshop at ASLO 2019 will include a tutorial for editing Wikipedia pages and a short edit-a-thon. We will provide instructional materials for participants who want to organize similar workshops at their home institutions and we will advertise for future online edit-a-thons. For more information about this event, please contact: Margaret Brisbin at margaret.marsbrisbin@oist.jp

Project Redefining Recognition Town Hall
Date: Wednesday, 27 February 2019
Time: 12:30 to 14:00
Location: Room 101

Project Redefining Recognition: Challenging Traditional Research Assessment -- In our current system, research assessment and reward are weighted heavily towards scientific inputs and outputs, and research impact is measured in funding dollars awarded and research articles produced. The value of science, however, extends well beyond contributions to the research activity itself. “Project Redefining Recognition” is a cross-society initiative which seeks to develop a shared future vision and clear set of actions across the Earth, Space, and Environmental Sciences to expand research assessment to explicitly include, recognize, and reward actions that advance open science, broad communication and public engagement.  As part of “Project Redefining Recognition,” this session will look closely at the ways in which ASLO researchers are sharing and applying their science, and the challenges and opportunities in our current system to recognize and reward those efforts. ASLO Director of Communications and Science Adrienne Sponberg will moderate a panel discussion and audience Q&A with experts from funding agencies, academia and scientific journals about how key players are changing how they assess research impact. For more information about this event, please contact: Adrienne Sponberg at sponberg@aslo.org

Update and Status of the Arctic-COLORS Science Program Town Hall
Date: Wednesday, 27 February 2019
Time: 12:30 to 14:00
Location: Room 209 C

Arctic-COLORS (AC) is a candidate NASA Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry Program field campaign program. A NASA panel has reviewed and is endorsing the AC Science Plan.  NASA will be moving forward on developing a plan for its implementation. AC proposes an integrative, interdisciplinary approach that combines detailed process studies, field surveys, advanced modeling tools, and enhanced remote-sensing retrievals from various platforms (ship-based, in-situ autonomous, airborne, and space-based). AC aims to quantify the response of the Arctic coastal environment to global change and anthropogenic disturbances – an imperative for developing mitigation and adaptation strategies for the region.  The Arctic-COLORS field campaign represents the first attempt to study the nearshore coastal Arctic (from riverine deltas and estuaries out to the coastal sea) as an integrated land-ocean atmosphere-biosphere system, as is required to determine present and future impacts of terrigenous, atmospheric and oceanic fluxes on coastal ecology, biogeochemistry and ecosystem services in the context of environmental (short-term) and climate (long-term) changes.  An update on the status of the Arctic-COLORS will be presented with Q&A and community input to follow. For more information about this event, please contact: Joe Salisbury at joe.salisbury@unh.edu

National Science Foundation Ocean Sciences Town Hall
Date: Wednesday, 27 February 2019
Time: 18:00 to 21:00
Location: Room 204

An update from the U.S. National Science Foundation, Division of Ocean Sciences, regarding recent developments in research funding, infrastructure, and education. A budgetary outlook and discussion of the Division of Ocean Sciences initiatives throughout the Division portfolio will be presented. The lead program officer of NSF's Biological Oceanography program will provide a brief presentation, to be followed by a question-and-answer session. National Science Foundation program officers will also be present to provide additional information as needed. For more information about this event, please contact:  Michael Sieracki (MSIERACK@nsf.gov).

Mixotrophy Workshop
Date: Wednesday, 27 February 2019
Time: 18:00 to 21:00
Location: Room 103 B

During this workshop, participants will discuss ideas and future plans relating to SS062: MIXOTROPHIC PROTISTS: AN UNDERRATED MAJORITY IN MARINE AND FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS? For more information about this event, please contact: Stella Berger at berger@igb-berlin.de

Strategies for Transboundary HABs Management Town Hall
Date: Thursday, 28 February 2019
Time: 12:30 to 14:00
Location: Room 103 B

All ASLO participants are invited to participate in a town-hall style gathering to share strategies for transboundary HABs management. Many waters suffering from Harmful Algal Blooms are “transboundary”—shared by multiple political jurisdictions. This geo-political reality presents unique challenges and opportunities for HABS research and management. Facilitators will share perspectives from the binational Great Lakes region. Most of the time will be spent asking participants to share their perspectives or experiences in transboundary collaboration to synthesize, translate, and/or deliver science to HABs managers. Participants will also be asked to share experiences with engaging managers to understand their science needs. They will also be asked to share lessons learned about what hasn’t worked and how we can we use those lessons to improve future activities. Finally, participants will document (for their keeping), and have the opportunity share with others, the strategies from this town hall discussion they plan to take back to their work. For more information about this event, please contact: Victoria Pebbles at vpebbles@glc.org


Teaching and Mentoring Under the Threat of Climate Change
Date: Thursday, 28 February 2019
Time: 12:30 to 14:00
Location: Room 204

During this workshop, we will discuss strategies for effectively conveying information to students about the impacts of climate change on aquatic environments, as well as methods for combating the anxiety or apathy that may occur while living and working under this existential threat. Climate change is upon us and we are being bombarded with information about the negative effects of global warming.  People from all walks of life – scientists, educators, politicians, journalists, and young and adult citizens – talk endlessly about this urgent issue, however, the relentless rhetoric about climate change impacts may result in fatigue and apathy from too much information about a seemingly insurmountable problem.  Through guided discussions, we will answer questions, share ideas, and discuss what the best approach may be for educators and mentors to effectively reach students and mentees.  But most importantly, we will need to hear from students and mentees about positive and effective ways to teach climate change awareness to new generations of students and scientists while increasing resiliency and optimism about the future for all. For more information about this event, please contact: Diana Varela at dvarela@uvic.ca.

Writing Effective Abstracts and Summaries Workshop 
Date: Thursday, 28 February 2019
Time: 12:30 to 13:30
Location: Room 209 C

Journal articles are the key means of communicating scientific research. Unfortunately, academic texts are often characterized by a complicated writing style and abundance of jargon, which reduces clarity and effectiveness. Join ASLO Raelyn Cole Editorial Fellows Dr. Laura Falkenberg and Dr. Kelsey Poulson-Ellestad to explore these issues for critical components of your scientific articles, including the title, abstract, keywords, and summary. Our goal for this workshop is to enhance your awareness of these important issues, and increase your ability to write articles that are clear and accessible to a broad audience.For more information about this workshop,  please contact Kelsey Poulson-Ellestad at kpoulsonellestad@roosevelt.edu.

Teaching Aquatic Biology with Aquaponics Workshop
Date: Friday, 1 March 2019
Time: 12:30 to 14:00
Location: Room 103 A

We use fairly inexpensive catalogs bought and DIY aquaponic and hydroponic systems as the context and background for classes in introductory biology, microbiology and more.  We have developed free digital content to support this pedagogy.The workshop will focus on digital content delivery as well as modeling systems we have developed for classroom and lab environments. For more information about this event, please contact: Christopher Perle at crperle@gmail.com