Candidate for Member at Large: Heather Reader

Heather Reader

Ph.D. 2011 (Marine Science, University of Georgia, USA)

 

Biographical Information

I received my Bachelor’s in Chemistry in 2005 from the University of Calgary (Canada). For grad school I decided to combine my love of chemistry and the ocean, and moved to the University of Georgia to study coastal photochemistry in the South Atlantic Bight and its contribution to carbon cycling in the marine environment. After my Ph.D., I wanted to explore the chemistry that drives the differences in reactivity of dissolved organic matter (DOM) that I found in my doctoral research and moved Sweden to work in boreal rivers at Lund University and later to the Technical University of Denmark to study sediment-driven organic matter cycling in the Baltic Sea. I have been an Assistant Professor at Memorial University since 2018. My research group investigates DOM cycling by combining multiple analytical methods to understand the chemical nature of DOM from different sources. We work primarily in marine environments but also in rivers, investigating how biotic and abiotic processes change chemical signatures in DOM and its ultimate fate in the marine environment.

Over my career, I have served our community by promoting the retention of women in science. I was on the board of the Women in Great Sciences (WINGS) network at Lund University from 2012-2014. In this capacity I organized monthly lunch seminars, and organized their 2013 annual meeting on the theme “Research Leadership and Management”. In 2018, I was Science Atlantic’s Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) Fall Speaker, giving talks at a number of Atlantic Canadian Universities, both with a research focus and a public engagement focus. Most recently, last spring I was an invited panelist for Memorial University’s edition of the IUPAC Global Women’s Breakfast on the theme of “Building bonds to create future leaders”. I am firmly committed to building and promoting equity in aquatic sciences.

Candidate Statement

In 2008, I attended my first ASLO meeting, the Ocean Sciences Meeting in Orlando. Since then I have tried to attend as many ASLO meetings as possible. I’ve attended meetings with other societies over the years, and I always find the ASLO sponsored meetings to be the best. It is a combination of the exciting, inspiring science in our fields and the atmosphere that ASLO members create. Over the years, I have taken advantage of student activities like mixers and “Meet the Editors” sessions, early career networking opportunities, the job boards, as well as the journals and e-lectures. The value I have gotten from all of these is unparalleled.

I have been an active reviewer for many journals since obtaining my Ph.D., including Limnology and Oceanography. I also have chaired sessions at Ocean Sciences Meetings, both in science sessions and education sessions, and I have served as a student presentation judge on a number of occasions. ASLO’s dedication to promoting education in aquatic sciences is inspiring. I strongly believe that education in science is crucial for all of society. Aquatic science is not always on curricula, but when it is, the value to students is clear. In my experience working with undergraduate students, the best moments are when we are in the field, and the students can connect to the science in a more tangible way than just in the classroom. The focus on both science and science education within ASLO is very important to me.

I believe that equity in sciences is an important part of making sure that science can serve society. Much of my work in this regard thus far has been to help support and promote the retention of women in science, but I am dedicated to equity for all scientists not just from a gender balance perspective, but equitable representation of historically marginalized groups, such as the LBGTQ+ community and BIPOC scientists. I hope that I would be able to help ASLO move forward with its goals of equity as a member of the board.

At this point in my career, I would really like to give back to the society that has given me so much. I want to serve on the board so that I can help to make sure that ASLO can continue to give aquatic scientists and educators the experiences that have had such a positive impact on me and my career.

In 2008, I attended my first ASLO meeting, the Ocean Sciences Meeting in Orlando. Since then I have tried to attend as many ASLO meetings as possible. I’ve attended meetings with other societies over the years, and I always find the ASLO sponsored meetings to be the best. It is a combination of the exciting, inspiring science in our fields and the atmosphere that ASLO members create. Over the years, I have taken advantage of student activities like mixers and “Meet the Editors” sessions, early career networking opportunities, the job boards, as well as the journals and e-lectures. The value I have gotten from all of these is unparalleled.

I have been an active reviewer for many journals since obtaining my Ph.D., including Limnology and Oceanography. I also have chaired sessions at Ocean Sciences Meetings, both in science sessions and education sessions, and I have served as a student presentation judge on a number of occasions. ASLO’s dedication to promoting education in aquatic sciences is inspiring. I strongly believe that education in science is crucial for all of society. Aquatic science is not always on curricula, but when it is, the value to students is clear. In my experience working with undergraduate students, the best moments are when we are in the field, and the students can connect to the science in a more tangible way than just in the classroom. The focus on both science and science education within ASLO is very important to me.

I believe that equity in sciences is an important part of making sure that science can serve society. Much of my work in this regard thus far has been to help support and promote the retention of women in science, but I am dedicated to equity for all scientists not just from a gender balance perspective, but equitable representation of historically marginalized groups, such as the LBGTQ+ community and BIPOC scientists. I hope that I would be able to help ASLO move forward with its goals of equity as a member of the board.

At this point in my career, I would really like to give back to the society that has given me so much. I want to serve on the board so that I can help to make sure that ASLO can continue to give aquatic scientists and educators the experiences that have had such a positive impact on me and my career.

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