Candidate for Member at Large: Hans Jakobsen

Hans Jakobsen

Ph.D 2001 (Marine biology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark) 

 

Biographical Information

My interest in marine biology has followed me for as long as I can remember, which is why I found it a natural calling to pursue this career path even before enrolling in graduate school. As a graduate student at the Marine Biological Station of the University of Copenhagen, I worked on the comparative ecology among heterotrophic protists in bioassays under Per Juel Hansen's supervision. This study formed the base of my future interest, shaped my early career, and inspired me to continue to study the ecological roles and species interactions of heterotrophic protists. After my Master's degree, I continued to research how rheotactic (the ability to sense moving water) protists detect fluid mechanical signals generated by prey and predators. During my PhD study, I spent six months as an intern at the University of Texas Marine Science Institute in Port Aransas, where I studied interactions between the nuisance brown tide algae and their grazers under the supervision of Edward Buskey. After graduation, I took up a postdoctoral post with Dr Suzanne Strom at the Shannon Point Marine Center, Western Washington University, WA. Together with Dr Strom, I investigated the role of light in regulating marine protists' feeding activity. After almost three years away from Denmark, I returned to Copenhagen, where I developed methods for in vivo and in situ quantification of protists in the lab and in the field at the Danish Fisheries Institute (now DTU AQUA, Technical University of Denmark). Since 2010, I have been with Aarhus University, Denmark, where my responsibility encompasses basic research, applied monitoring, as well as an advisory for the Danish environmental protection agency and the Danish food administration. Working at the interface between science and advisory has been an inspiring experience, and I enjoy making scientific knowledge relevant to resource managers and policymakers. This work allows me to contribute my expertise and make recommendations to the various strategic frameworks for the stewardship of the Baltic and the seas around northwestern Europe.

Candidate Statement

I have been a member of ASLO since 1998, and I attended my first ASLO conference in Santa Fe in 1999. Although ASLO conferences were often held far away from my home base, I participated in many of them when given the opportunity. I enjoyed co-chair a special session in 2015, and I served as poster evaluator on several occasions. I have spent time in many places for various lengths of time, from months to years throughout my career. These include Scandinavia, Europe and the USA. Through this experience, I have come to appreciate the importance of internationality and diversity in sciences, which I see as one of the main pillars of ASLO.

During my research travel around the globe, I had the privilege to meet and work with brilliant scientists of a broad spectrum of nationality, some of whom are not yet ASLO members. As a board member, I will promote a wider involvement of traditionally underrepresented groups to make ASLO a truly global organization.

We are facing increasing pressure from climate change, which is affecting biodiversity and ecological processes. At the same time, there is an increasing demand for ecosystem services from our aquatic and marine environments for the growing and resource-hungry population. As an advisor to the Danish environmental protection agency and the Danish food administration, I often see first-handed conservation and exploitation interests collide. My job provides me with the opportunity to help resolve these differences by formulating science-based recommendations and indicators to the various strategic frameworks for the stewardship of the Baltic and seas around northwestern Europe. The experience also gives me a unique perspective into bridging academic science and real-world policy applications, an area I hope to help ASLO develop further.

Being a member of multiple international working groups, I have a deep understanding of cross-border collaboration that is essential if we are to restore and maintain the planet's health for generations to come. As a board member, I will promote equality—Not only equality in the workplace environment but also between nations and people in our governance of natural resources'. I firmly believe that this is an important task ahead if ASLO is to further develop its voice on these critical matters.
Thus, it is my vision to maintain and grow the international membership of ASLO. Still, I will also aim to improve international collaborations at all career levels and facilitate dialogue with policymakersI have been a member of ASLO since 1998, and I attended my first ASLO conference in Santa Fe in 1999. Although ASLO conferences were often held far away from my home base, I participated in many of them when given the opportunity. I enjoyed co-chair a special session in 2015, and I served as poster evaluator on several occasions. I have spent time in many places for various lengths of time, from months to years throughout my career. These include Scandinavia, Europe and the USA. Through this experience, I have come to appreciate the importance of internationality and diversity in sciences, which I see as one of the main pillars of ASLO.

During my research travel around the globe, I had the privilege to meet and work with brilliant scientists of a broad spectrum of nationality, some of whom are not yet ASLO members. As a board member, I will promote a wider involvement of traditionally underrepresented groups to make ASLO a truly global organization.

We are facing increasing pressure from climate change, which is affecting biodiversity and ecological processes. At the same time, there is an increasing demand for ecosystem services from our aquatic and marine environments for the growing and resource-hungry population. As an advisor to the Danish environmental protection agency and the Danish food administration, I often see first-handed conservation and exploitation interests collide. My job provides me with the opportunity to help resolve these differences by formulating science-based recommendations and indicators to the various strategic frameworks for the stewardship of the Baltic and seas around northwestern Europe. The experience also gives me a unique perspective into bridging academic science and real-world policy applications, an area I hope to help ASLO develop further.

Being a member of multiple international working groups, I have a deep understanding of cross-border collaboration that is essential if we are to restore and maintain the planet's health for generations to come. As a board member, I will promote equality—Not only equality in the workplace environment but also between nations and people in our governance of natural resources'. I firmly believe that this is an important task ahead if ASLO is to further develop its voice on these critical matters.
Thus, it is my vision to maintain and grow the international membership of ASLO. Still, I will also aim to improve international collaborations at all career levels and facilitate dialogue with policymakers

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