SS4.02 The Role of Microbiology in Trace Metal and Organic Contaminant Cycling in Aquatic Systems
Date: Wednesday, June 12, 2002
Time: 12:00:00 PM
Location: Esquimalt
 
SuttonPL, U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg , USA, psutton@usgs.gov
Swarzenski, P, W, U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg , USA, pswarzen@usgs.gov
Edgar, N, T, U.S. Geological Survey, St. Petersburg , USA, tedgar@usgs.gov
 
TRACE METAL PROFILES IN A MEROMICTIC LAKE: LAKE TULANE, FLORIDA
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Lake sediments preserve important information of past conditions of a lake and its environs. Therefore, past natural and anthropogenic inputs can be determined from age-dated sediment samples. Sediment cores from Lake Tulane (Avon Park, Florida) were examined for a suite of elements to reconstruct historical changes from anthropogenic inputs. Lake Tulane is a deep (~20m) sinkhole ridge lake that is believed to be one of the oldest lakes in North America, with an age in excess of 50,000 years. The lake is the result of subsidence of the overlying sands and clays as a result of limestone dissolution. In the early 20th century, major changes in anthropogenic inputs occurred when a railway was built adjacent to the lake. These changes are reflected in increased concentrations of silica, titanium, chromium, manganese and cobalt in the sediments corresponding to a time interval representing the early 1900's.