SS3.13 Natural Disturbances on Landscapes and Their Impacts on Aquatic Systems
Date: Thursday, June 13, 2002
Time: 4:30:00 PM
Location: Carson A
 
Enache M , Queen's University, Kingston, , enachem@biology.queensu.ca
Cumming, B, , Queen's University, Kingston, CANADA, cummingb@biology.queensu.ca
 
TWO CENTURIES OF CLIMATE AND FOREST FIRE DYNAMICS AS INFERRED FROM LAKE SEDIMENTS ALONG A NORTH-SOUTH TRANSECT ON INTERIOR PLATEAU (B.C., CANADA)
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Forest fire is one of the most important disturbance factors in forested landscapes from British Columbia. Predictions of future warmer and drier conditions will have important implications to the incidence and extent of wild fires. The main objective of this study is to infer climate/ forest fire relationships from lake sediments along a north-south transect on Interior Plateau, B.C. Here we present the first part of this study. Three short cores were collected from lakes along the north-south transect. The sediment cores are analysed ~ 3-5 year resolution for the last two centuries to facilitate comparison between instrumental records and known periods of forest fires. Reconstruction of past climatic conditions is based on qualitative and quantitative inferences from diatom assemblages. This high resolution analysis of variation in diatom taxa along with variation in microcharcoal accumulation rates will allow to establish climate-forest fires relationships and if changes in water chemistry are attributable to fire or to changes caused by climate that also resulted in changes in forest fires.