SS1.03 Zooplankton Response to Climate Variability
Date: Monday, June 10, 2002
Time: 4:15:00 PM
Location: Lecture Theatre
 
KaufmannRS, Marine/Environ. Studies, Univ. of San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA, kaufmann@sandiego.edu
Fisher, E, C, MBRD, Scripps Inst. of Oceanography, UCSD, La Jolla, CA, USA, 
Gill, W, H, MBRD, Scripps Inst. of Oceanography, UCSD, La Jolla, CA, USA, 
King, A, L, MBRD, Scripps Inst. of Oceanography, UCSD, La Jolla, CA, USA, 
Laubacher, M, , MBRD, Scripps Inst. of Oceanography, UCSD, La Jolla, CA, USA, 
Sullivan, B, , MBRD, Scripps Inst. of Oceanography, UCSD, La Jolla, CA, USA, 
 
TEMPORAL PATTERNS IN THE DISTRIBUTION, BIOMASS AND COMMUNITY STRUCTURE OF MACROZOOPLANKTON AND MICRONEKTON WITHIN DECEPTION ISLAND, ANTARCTICA
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The pelagic community within the flooded caldera of Deception Island, Antarctica, was sampled with a 10 m2 opening-closing MOCNESS trawl on five cruises between Feb 1999 and Dec 2000. Collections were made in 50 m strata from the surface to 150 m depth in an area with a bottom depth of 160-165 m. From Feb 1999 through Feb 2000 the pelagic community was dominated by krill, primarily Euphausia crystallorophias and E. superba, which made up >90% of total biomass. Community composition shifted during early 2000, and samples from May and Dec 2000 contained a more diverse assemblage and large numbers of ctenophores, comprising >50% of pelagic biomass. The change in composition was accompanied by displacement of the biomass mode to greater depths, due to the deeper occurrence of ctenophores, compared to krill. Integrated water column biomass increased substantially from 1999 to 2000, primarily because of elevated abundances of gelatinous zooplankton and the presence of significantly larger krill during 2000.