SS1.10 Marine Protected Areas: Critical tools for Marine Biodiversity Conservation
Date: Monday, June 10, 2002
Time: 4:30:00 PM
Location: Esquimalt
 
Semmens, B, X, University of Washington, Seattle, USA, semmens@u.washington.edu
SalomonAK, University of Washington, Seattle, USA, salomon@u.washington.edu
Buhle, E, , University of Washington, Seattle, USA, buhle@u.washington.edu
Ruesink, J, L, University of Washington, Seattle, USA, ruesink@u.washington.edu
 
ARE THE DETAILS OF DISPERSAL AND CONNECTEDNESS NECESSARY FOR EFFECTIVE MARINE RESERVE SELECTION?
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Effective marine reserve networks typically require linkages among reserved areas. Because larval dispersal is extremely difficult to measure, it would be useful to have other indicators of how a particular site might contribute to species persistence within a reserve network. Two measurable characteristics at the site level are relative recruitment (how many propagules arrive in an area compared to other areas) and R0 (how many propagules are produced by each propagule that arrives). We used these two characteristics to select reserves in a simulation model where larval flux among sites was established randomly but not used explicitly in site selection. Choosing reserves based on high R0 or recruitment led to higher overall population growth than selecting reserves at random. These reserve choice methods were particularly beneficial when fishing impact was high outside reserves and when the proportion of sites in reserves was large. Our results support reserve choice rules based on site specific productivity and recruitment. However, temporal change in site connections or non-random connections could change how well R0 and recruitment indicate reserve value.