SS3.10 Ecological Implications of Terrestrial Inputs into Lakes and Ponds
Date: Tuesday, June 11, 2002
Time: 10:00:00 AM
Location: Esquimalt
 
CarignanR, Dépt. sc. biologiques, Montréal, Canada, richard.carignan@umontreal.ca
Hudon, C, , Centre Saint-Laurent, Environnement Canada, Montreal, Canada, christiane.hudon@ec.gc.ca
Blais, A, M, Biology, McGill University, Montréal, Canada, anne-marie.blais@mcgill.ca
Vis, C, , Dépt. sc. biologiques, Montréal, Canada, chantal_vis@hotmail.com
Forget, M, H, Dépt. sc. biologiques, Montréal, Canada, m_forget@hotmail.com
 
IS TERRESTRIAL ORGANIC MATTER AN IMPORTANT ENERGY SOURCE FOR AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS?
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The relative importance of local photosynthesis and terrestrial organic matter as energy sources to aquatic systems is still controversial. The debate appears to persist for many reasons including ecosystem diversity, the lack of long-term observations at the ecosystem-level, inadequate methodologies, and the questionable usefulness of concepts such as net autotrophy/heterotrophy. Here, we present evidence gathered in large rivers (St. Lawrence, Paraná), streams (North America and Europe) and oligotrophic lakes (Canadian Shield) suggesting that allochthonous organic matter is only a minor energy source to aquatic food webs.