CS33 Sediment-Water Interactions
Date: Wednesday, June 12, 2002
Location: Poster Session - VCC
 
AlbrechtDR, LLO/Univ. Minn., Duluth, USA, dalbrech@d.umn.edu
Swenson, J, B, LLO/Univ. Minn., Duluth, USA, jswenso2@d.umn.edu
Brown, E, T, LLO/Univ. Minn., Duluth, USA, etbrown@d.umn.edu
Wattrus, N, J, LLO/Univ. Minn., Duluth, USA, nwattrus@d.umn.edu
Huff, M, D, LLO/Univ. Minn., Duluth, USA, mhuff@d.umn.edu
Johnson, T, C, LLO/Univ. Minn., Duluth, USA, tcj@d.umn.edu
Parker, G, , St. Anthony Falls Lab., Mpls., USA, parke002@umn.edu
 
IMPORTANCE OF TURBIDITY CURRENTS IN THE DISPERSAL OF NEMADJI RIVER SEDIMENTS IN LAKE SUPERIOR
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The Nemadji River watershed delivers a large volume of fine-grained sediment as suspended load to the extreme western end of Lake Superior. The large suspended-sediment load and absence of a salinity barrier allow the Nemadji River outflow to plunge on a regular basis upon entering the lake; Lake Superior thus forms an ideal natural experiment for studying turbidity currents. We analyzed the sedimentology and geochemistry of 120 ponar dredge samples and 15 short cores from the western end of Lake Superior. In addition, we collected an extensive array of sidescan-sonar and echo-sounder data. With our sedimentologic, geochemical, and bathymetric data, we delineated the spatial extent (footprint) and stratigraphic abundance of Nemadji River-derived turbidites in the western end of Lake Superior.