SS1.07 Ecological Links to Population Dynamics and Productivity of Salmon
Date: Friday, June 14, 2002
Time: 10:30:00 AM
Location: Lecture Theatre
 
HyattKD, Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, Canada, hyattk@pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca
 
ECOSYSTEM CONSIDERATIONS IN THE FORMULATION OF BIOLOGICAL REFERENCE POINTS FOR MANAGEMENT OF SALMON IN CANADA'S PACIFIC REGION
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More than 9000 populations of salmon return annualy to thousands of streams throughout British Columbia. Important ecosystem linkages to salmon exist in both aquatic and terrestrial communities for a diversity of primary producers, invertebrates and vertebrates. The status of salmon populations is often treated as an indicator of the capacity of aquatic and terrestrial riparian ecosystems to support regional biodiversity. Accordingly, there is a need to define biological limit or target reference points for Canada’s new Wild Salmon Policy to accommodate ecosystem based salmon management objectives mandated under the Canada Oceans Act.. Quantitative associations in annual variations among salmon, large carnivores, nutrient loading rates and habitat productivity have been examined for over a decade in several British Columbia watersheds. Results indicate that reference points for salmon escapement objectives that satisfy classic stock recruitment needs are substantially lower than those that satisfy habitat nutrient loading requirements. However, the impact of potential declines in habitat productivity induced by salmon harvest may be partially mitigated through future programs of controlled nutrient additions to watersheds where nutrients are in short supply.