SS4.02 The Role of Microbiology in Trace Metal and Organic Contaminant Cycling in Aquatic Systems
Date: Wednesday, June 12, 2002
Time: 11:15:00 AM
Location: Esquimalt
 
MylonSE, Yale School of the Environment, New Haven, USA, steven.mylon@yale.edu
Benoit, G, , Yale School of the Environment, New Haven, USA, gaboury.benoit@yale.edu
Twining, B, , Marine Research Center, SUNY, Stony Brook, USA, btwining@ic.sunysb.edu
Fisher, N, , Marine Research Center, SUNY, Stony Brook, USA, nfisher@notes.cc.sunysb.edu
 
PREDICTION OF TRACE METAL BIOAVAILABILITY IN FRESH WATERS BASED ON COMPLEXATION CHARACTERISTICS TO DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER
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The fate, transport and bioavailability of trace metals in natural waters are primarily dependent on their speciation. In freshwater systems, complexation is thought to be dominated by dissolved organic matter (DOM). Cadmium, lead, and copper complexation characteristics (available ligand concentration and conditional stability constants) were determined for two Connecticut rivers by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV). The Quinnipiac River has been impacted by substantial development and urbanization while the Hammonasset River has a relatively undeveloped watershed. We conducted measurements by voltammetry along with parallel experiments to measure the uptake of various metals by green algae and diatoms. Results of the uptake experiments are consistent with calculated speciation based on the measured DOM complexation characteristics, supporting the belief that voltammetry can provide valid information about metal bioavailability.