SS2.06 Microbial Diversity in Time and Space
Date: Tuesday, June 11, 2002
Time: 11:30:00 AM
Location: Lecture Theatre
 
FredericksonCM, Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, cindyf@interchange.ubc.ca
Suttle, C, A, Departments of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Microbiology and Immunology, and Botany, UBC, Vancouver, Canada, csuttle@eos.ubc.ca
 
GENETIC ANALYSIS REVEALS THAT CYANOPHAGE COMMUNITIES ARE INFLUENCED BY WATER COLUMN STRATIFICATION
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Water samples were collected from three fjords, Salmon Inlet, Malaspina Inlet and Pendrell Sound, adjacent to the Strait of Georgia, British Columbia in August 1999. At each location, six samples were collected at various depths from the surface to the pycnocline. Cyanomyovirus community diversity was examined using PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of gene fragments amplified from concentrated virioplankton samples. DGGE banding patterns were used to compare similarities between communities at different locations and depths. Generally, cyanomyovirus communities were most similar within inlets; however, Salmon Inlet communities were more similar with depth, than those in Malaspina Inlet and Pendrell Sound. This is not surprising, as Salmon Inlet was less stratified than either Malaspina Inlet or Pendrell Sound. This study demonstrates that there are differences between cyanomyovirus communities over small spatial scales and that community composition is variable depending on location. We hypothesize that virus community composition is influenced by the physical characteristics of the water column.