SS1.03 Zooplankton Response to Climate Variability
Date: Monday, June 10, 2002
Time: 4:00:00 PM
Location: Lecture Theatre
 
WilhelmFM, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, USA, fwilhelm@zoology.siu.edu
Burns, C, W, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand, carolyn.burns@stonebow.otago.ac.nz
Schindler, D, W, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada, d.schindler@ulaberta.ca
 
THE RESPONSE OF AQUATIC INVERTEBRATES TO CLIMATE CHANGE: PREDICTIONS FROM TEMPERATURE-MEDIATED REPRODUCTIVE STRATEGIES
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Global climatic warming is expected to increase the temperature of aquatic environments resulting in changes such as species composition, the number of individuals and food-web interactions. A goal of current research is to predict these changes. We use amphipods, for which reproductive information is readily obtained, to predict the response of these important populations to warming trends from their reproductive strategies at different temperatures. We examined populations of Gammarus lacustris along an elevation gradient in the Rocky Mountains of Canada. In New Zealand, we examined Paracalliope fluviatilis in a high latitude lake on the South Island in different seasons. The reproductive strategy of both species was strikingly similar. Many, small and light eggs were produced at warm temperatures and few, large heavy eggs at cold temperatures. If the reproductive strategy is under phenotypic control, the number of individuals of each species should increase at warmer temperatures. However, food availability and the susceptibility of small individuals to predators may limit population size.