SS1.09 Fisheries Population Linkage Spatial and Temporal Variation in Zooplankton
Date: Wednesday, June 12, 2002
Time: 9:30:00 AM
Location: Carson C
 
PerryRI, Fisheries & Oceans Canada, Nanaimo, BC, Canada, perryi@pac.dfo-mpo.gc.ca
 
ZOOPLANKTON CONTROL FISH POPULATION DYNAMICS IN MARINE SYSTEMS: MYTH OR REALITY?
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Zooplankton – fish linkages are a core concept in marine biology. This should be “obvious”, since if there is no food, then there can be no fish. It leads to theories such as match - mismatch. But most of these concepts actually have relatively little detailed and unambiguous observational evidence in marine systems. Zooplankton and fish, at least as aggregate groups looked at to date, appear to be only “weakly” coupled. In contrast, aquatic systems seem to demonstrate much clearer zooplankton – fish linkages: these might be considered to show ”strong” coupling. This presentation explores the evidence for zooplankton controls on fish populations in marine systems, within an oceanographic background. Why do zooplankton – fish linkages appear to differ between marine and aquatic systems? Are they structured in different ways? What can be learned from aquatic systems about the linkages between zooplankton and fish in marine systems, and how to look for these linkages? The presentation also considers how, or even whether, zooplankton – fish linkages can be incorporated into fisheries management and ecosystem-based approaches, in particular if these linkages are only “weakly” structured.