SS1.02 Geochemical Tracers in Calcified Structures: Implications for Fisheries Research
Date: Tuesday, June 11, 2002
Time: 11:00:00 AM
Location: Carson A
 
NishimotoMM, University of California, Marine Science Institute, Santa Barbara, USA, nishimot@lifesci.ucsb.edu
Washburn, L, , University of California, Dept. of Geography, Santa Barbara, USA, washburn@icess.ucsb.edu
 
CAN OTOLITHS LINK EARLY FISH GROWTH AND TRANSPORT TO MESOSCALE COASTAL CIRCULATION PATTERNS OFF CALIFORNIA?
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A novel approach incorporating otolith microstructure, otolith LA-ICPMS microchemistry, and a time series of remote-sensing high frequency radar data is used to link early fish growth and transport to coastal circulation patterns. In June 1998, very high abundances of late-stage larval and pelagic juvenile fishes were observed in a cyclonic eddy in the Santa Barbara Channel, CA. Analysis of otoliths from pelagic juvenile shortbelly rockfish (Sebastes jordani) collected during the oceanographic survey is applied to questions that include: Do natural groupings of young fish by age and mesoscale spatial distribution possess unique otolith elemental signatures? Can retention in a closed cyclonic eddy feature during planktonic development be linked to an elemental signature on the time-keeping otolith? Is eddy retention a mechanism for enhancing fish growth? This study puts to test the utility of the otolith as a marker of distinct groups in a population and as a data recorder of exchange (i.e., connectivity) among these groups brought about by mesoscale coastal circulation.