CS16 Harmful Algal Blooms
Date: Wednesday, June 12, 2002
Time: 5:00:00 PM
Location: Sidney
 
LesterKM, University of South Florida , St Petersburg, USA, klester@seas.marine.usf.edu
Ault, D, N, University of South Florida, St. Petersburg FL, USA, dspence@seas.marine.usf.edu
Heil, C, A, University of South Florida, St. Petersburg FL, USA, cheil@seas.marine.usf.edu
Neely, M, B, University of South Florida, St. Petersburg FL, USA, mneely@seas.marine.usf.edu
Merkt, R, E, University of South Florida, St. Petersburg FL, USA, rem2@htcc.com
Murasko, S, , University of South Florida, St. Petersburg FL, USA, smurasko@yahoo.com
Vargo, G, A, University of South Florida, St. Petersburg FL, USA, gvargo@seas.marine.usf.edu
Walsh, J, J, University of South Florida, St. Petersburg FL, USA, jwalsh@seas.marine.usf.edu
 
KARENIA BREVIS AND ZOOPLANKTON POPULATION CHANGES ON THE WEST FLORIDA SHELF
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Karenia brevis, the causative red tide organism of the West Florida Shelf, can have profound effects on aquatic ecosystems. Little is known of the relationship between K. brevis and higher trophic levels. A series of zooplankton tows was conducted within two K. brevis blooms in 1999 and 2001 off the central West Florida coast. In some cases, the presence of high concentrations of K. brevis resulted in severe shifts in larval abundance and dominance by larger holoplankton species. In a bloom with an estuarine signature, Acartia tonsa and Evadne tergestina were numerically dominant, although both of these populations appeared to suffer from reduced fecundity. In a bloom with an offshore signature, Temora turbinada and Centropages velificatus dominated the zooplankton population, though there did not appear to be any evidence for reduced fecundity in these populations. At some stations, the concentration of K. brevis in surface waters and subsequent low concentration sub-surface layers resulted in a