SS2.06 Microbial Diversity in Time and Space
Date: Tuesday, June 11, 2002
Time: 12:00:00 PM
Location: Lecture Theatre
 
ShortSM, Department of Botany, University of British Columbia , Vancouver, Canada, smshort@interchange.ubc.ca
Suttle, C, A, Departments of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Microbiology and Immunology, and Botany, UBC, Vancouver, Canada, csuttle@eos.ubc.ca
 
SEASONAL PATTERNS OF MARINE ALGAL VIRUS COMMUNITIES DETECTED BY GENETIC FINGERPRINTING
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To examine temporal changes in marine algal virus communities, the virus size fraction was concentrated by ultracentrifugation from weekly water samples collected at Jericho Pier, Vancouver, Canada. Degenerate PCR primers that amplify a conserved fragment of many algal virus polymerase genes were used to generate denaturing-gradient-gel-electrophoresis fingerprints of virus communities. Densitometry plots of the fingerprints were analyzed and used to construct dendrograms of sample similarity. These comparisons revealed distinct seasonal trends. For example, samples collected in late spring (April to May) of two different years were more similar to each other than to samples collected at other times of the year. Similarly, samples from the summer (June and July) tended to cluster and were least similar to other samples. Qualitative examination of this data set revealed that virus fingerprint similarities were best predicted by the time of year rather than water temperature, salinity, or Chlorophyll concentration. These data demonstrate that patterns of virus community succession can be monitored using established molecular techniques.