SS3.08 Application of Automated Technology to Detect Environmental Change
Date: Thursday, June 13, 2002
Time: 10:15:00 AM
Location: View Royal
 
BeutlerM, Max-Planck-Institute for Limnology, Ploen, Germany, MartinBeutler@gmx.de
Wiltshire, K, H, BAH, Alfred Wegner Institute, Helgoland, Germany, kwiltshire@awi-bremerhaven.de
Reineke, C, , Max-Planck-Institute for Limnology, Ploen, Germany, Reineke@mpil-ploen.mpg.de
Moldaenke, C, , bbe Moldaenke GmbH, Kiel-Kronshagen, Germany, bbe@bbe-moldaenke.de
 
IN VIVO FLUORESCENCE OF PHYCOCYANIN IN COMBINATION WITH MULTISPECTRAL CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPY
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Our new approach involves a combination of phycocyanin and chlorophyll fluorescence spectroscopy and enhances the multispectral methods for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of phytoplankton. The use of the phycocyanin fluorescence signal in combination with our recently developed approach for phytoplankton analysis with chlorophyll fluorescence spectroscopy allows a more detailed study of cyanobacteria and other phytoplankton in-vivo and in-situ. The photosynthetic apparatus of cyanobacteria has a unique composition compared with other phytoplankton. This is most obvious in the structure of the light-harvesting antennae - the phycobilisomes. All phycobilisomes contain phycocyanin as a pigment. Phycocyanin is therefore a very useful marker pigment for cyanobacterial abundance. Fluorescence of cyanobacteria was measured with a new fluorometer at seven excitation wavelength ranges and several detection wavelengths. An energy distribution model describing energy pathways in the cyanobacterial photosynthetic apparatus was tested for cyanobacteria grown under various environmental conditions. Measurements of phycocyanin concentrations were carried out in the presence of other phytoplankton. The correlation of fluorometric results to photometric phycocyanin analysis was calculated. The use of this method for natural phytoplankton communities is discussed.