SS3.17 Global Mercury Cycling: From Natural to Anthropogenic Sources
Date: Tuesday, June 11, 2002
Time: 11:30:00 AM
Location: Carson C
 
ReinfelderJR, Dept. of Env. Sci., Rutgers University, New Brunswick, USA, reinfelder@envsci.rutgers.edu
Zhuang, Y, , Rutgers University, New Brunswick, USA, 
Gigliotti, C, , Rutgers University, New Brunswick, USA, 
Totten, L, , Rutgers University, New Brunswick, USA, 
Eisenreich, S, J, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, USA, 
 
SOURCES AND DEPOSITION FLUXES OF MERCURY IN NEW JERSEY RAIN AND FINE AEROSOLS
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Atmospheric deposition of Hg has been linked to Hg methylation and bioaccumulation in aquatic ecosystems. In order to estimate the relative importance of known and unknown sources of Hg to the New Jersey atmosphere, we performed principal component analysis using the concentrations of Hg and other elements in rain and fine aerosols (PM2.5). As expected, much of the variability in the concentration of atmospheric Hg is explained by the variability of tracers linked to waste incineration, oil combustion, smog, and metal smelting, but a significant portion (20%) of the variability in atmospheric Hg was not explained by that of the chemical tracers. Wet deposition fluxes ranged from 13-18 g m-2 y-1 and were generally highest in the summer. Dry deposition accounted for less than 8 % of the total atmospheric flux. A 2 cm rain event would increase the total Hg in surface waters of a coastal estuary by 20-35%. Thus, although indirect atmospheric deposition via runoff contributes most of the Hg to small water bodies, direct deposition may be important in providing bioavailable Hg to these aquatic systems on an event basis.