SS4.11 Water and Society - Science and Management in a Social and Economic Context
Date: Wednesday, June 12, 2002
Time: 4:00:00 PM
Location: Carson A
 
GoldmanCR, Environmental Science and Policy, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA, crgoldman@ucdavis.edu
 
THE ESSENTIAL ROLE OF SCIENCE IN THE RESTORATION AND MANAGEMENT OF THE WORLD'S LAKES
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Aquatic ecosystems worldwide are under increasing anthropogenic stress. Limnologists and oceanographers alike need to convert basic research into adaptive management. Policy decisions have often been based on short-term data that are lacking methodologically or subject to superficial interpretation. Long-term data sets, including paleolimnological studies of sedimentation and pollutants, are increasingly valuable to understanding and managing lakes, their surrounding watershed, and basin air quality. Many developing nations are water-deficient in the face of increasing populations, making conservation of freshwater resources a critically important concern. At Lake Tahoe, which has been losing its Secchi transparency at an average annual rate of 0.3 meters, a multidisciplinary approach is essential to developing effective management strategies for solving complex environmental problems. Ecologists have an urgent responsibility to meet the growing global challenge for restoration and preservation of limited and increasingly-threatened water supplies. Science-based long-term studies must be at the forefront in developing improved adaptive management practices for aquatic ecosystems worldwide.