SS4.08 Global Freshwater Quality: Issues, needs and solutions
Date: Wednesday, June 12, 2002
Time: 11:15:00 AM
Location: Carson A
 
BoyerGL, State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry, , Syracuse, USA, glboyer@esf.edu
Satchwell, M, F, SUNY-ESF, Syracuse, USA, mfsatchw@syr.edu
Patchett, E, A, SUNY-ESF, Syracuse, USA, 
Yang, X, , SUNY-ESF, Syracuse, USA, 
 
TOXIC CYANOBACTERIA IN NEW YORK STATE WATERS; RESULTS FROM TWO YEARS OF FIELD STUDIES.
image
The occurrence of toxic Cyanobacteria, or blue green algae, has increased on a global scale over the last few years. Blooms, once thought to be limited to smaller ponds and reservoirs, have occurred in larger lakes and rivers. In New York State, recent toxic blooms in Lake Champlain have caused widespread concern over the safety of the water supply for several major cities. Very little is known about the environmental factors that lead to the formation of these toxic blooms, or the distribution of toxic species in these more temperate lakes and reservoirs. Water samples were collected from 130+ locations around New York State during the summers of 2000 and 2001. All samples were analyzed for basic water quality parameters and for the cyanobacteria hepatotoxin microcystin(s), and the neurotoxins anatoxin-a and PSP toxins. Toxicity was confirmed using multiple independent assays. Microcystin(s) were of most concern with 18% of the samples in 2000 containing detectable concentrations. A lesser number of samples (4%) contained the neurotoxin anatoxin-a, though that toxin was responsible for dog fatalities at Lake Champlain. Species identification was not a good predictive tool for the presence of cyanobacteria toxins. Detailed analysis of the water chemistry data for these samples is currently in progress, but it does not appear that cyanotoxin production was directly correlated with the nutrients in the water. (Supported by NY Sea Grant)