SS1.07 Ecological Links to Population Dynamics and Productivity of Salmon
Date: Friday, June 14, 2002
Time: 10:45:00 AM
Location: Lecture Theatre
 
Gregory-EavesIS, PEARL, Dept. of Biology, Queen's University, Kingston, Canada, gregoryr@biology.queensu.ca
Finney, B, P, Institute of Marine Science, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, USA, finney@ims.alaska.edu
Douglas, M, S, PAL, Dept. of Geology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, msvd@geology.utoronto.ca
Smol, J, , PEARL, Dept. of Biology, Queen's University, Kingston, Canada, smolj@biology.queensu.ca
 
LONG-TERM POPULATION DYNAMICS OF SOCKEYE SALMON FROM SOUTH-CENTRAL ALASKA: A PALEOLIMNOLOGICAL STUDY
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Monitoring records, where present, have demonstrated that Pacific salmon have undergone tremendous variability over the past 100 years. Great controversy exists over the causes for the apparent fluctuations in abundances of Pacific salmon, as numerous stressors (e.g. commercial harvest, climatic change, habitat alterations) may be responsible. However, by extending monitoring records for sockeye salmon back in time (pre-1900s) through analyzing salmon nursery lake sediments for d15N and diatoms, we have demonstrated the significance of climatic variability in affecting salmon before the onset of commercial harvesting. Our paleolimnological records from Kodiak Island and Bristol Bay, Alaska, show both dramatic decadal and century-scale fluctuations in sockeye salmon abundances over the past ~2000 years. In this paper we will present results from two additional Alaskan sockeye salmon lakes, Hewitt and Packers lakes, which are located north and east of our published study sites. Comparisons of inferred sockeye salmon abundances between these and our published sites will be drawn to further explore the role of local and regional forcing mechanisms over a much larger geographical area.