CS26 Organic Carbon Dynamics
Date: Thursday, June 13, 2002
Location: Poster Session - VCC
 
PowellLM, West Virginia University, Morgantown, USA, LZDUFFER@AOL.COM
Timperman, A, T, West Virginia University, Morgantown, USA, Aaron.Timperman@mail.wvu.edu
 
RECOVERY, SEPARATION, AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE DISSOLVED PROTEINS IN SEAWATER.
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Proteins, as biopolymers, are probably the most characterizable portion of marine DOM at the molecular level. An extremely small fraction of these dissolved proteins appear to be resistant to normal degradation processes and accumulate in seawater. Previous work (1) suggests there are a very few number of refractory proteins present at detectable concentrations, indicative of selective enrichment. Herein, we will present methodology for reproducible and efficient recovery of dissolved proteins from seawater. The combination of tangential flow ultrafiltration and methanol/chloroform/water precipitation permit visualization of standard proteins recovered from aged seawater in both 1D and 2D electropherograms. Preliminary results indicate that the use of 2DE minimizes sample contamination by non-proteinaceous DOM. Currently, we are using tandem mass spectrometry and database matching to identify dissolved proteins recovered from seawater samples taken from the Gulf of Mexico. Our preliminary data confirm Tanoue’s results, and we expect that further sequence analysis will provide insights into the relative contributions of selective preservation and physical protection mechanisms for the survival of these biomolecules. References: 1. Tanoue, E., Detection of Dissolved Protein Molecules in Oceanic Waters. Marine Chemistry, 1995. 51: p. 239-252.