SS4.08 Global Freshwater Quality: Issues, needs and solutions
Date: Wednesday, June 12, 2002
Time: 9:45:00 AM
Location: Carson A
 
KUMAGAIM, Lake Biwa Research Institute, Otsu, Japan, kumagai@lbri.go.jp
 
DESIGN OF SMAP FOR MONITORING GLOBAL FRESHWATER QUALITY AND QUANTITY
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In developing countries there are many complicated water pathways, and it is not easy to monitor water quality as well as quantity on a large-scale area. Many channels, ponds, streams and rice paddies intermix, and even water direction is changeable from time to time. We propose a new technology to monitor such global and complicated freshwater quality and quantity to evaluate water cycles, study mass dynamics and establish proper water resource management. This system is called SMAP (Synchronized Multiple Autonomous Platforms), which consists of several independent systems such as synchronized measurement of environmental components, autonomous inter-calibration, network based numerical simulation models and network communication. If this system is robustly designed and successful, we will be able to monitor environments at more than 10,000 platforms in a short time with less difficulty than is currently possible, and may estimate even nutrient loading from non-point sources. Three or four platforms make a group and work together like synchronized swimmers, and each group is linked by micro-wave based LAN. We also plan to develop new sensors that can be used under rough conditions without frequent maintenance.