SS3.01 Landscape Control of High Latitude Lake and River Ecosystems
Date: Thursday, June 13, 2002
Time: 3:00:00 PM
Location: Carson A
 
BrightDA, Royal Roads University, Victoria, Canada, doug.bright@royalroads.ca
Koeck, G, , University of Innsbruk, Innsbruk, Austria, Guenter.Koeck@uibk.ac.at
Doblander, C, , University of Innsbruk, Innsbruk, Austria, 
Reist, J, , Freshwater Institute, Victoria, Canada, 
Babaluk, J, , Freshwater Institute, Winnipeg, Canada, 
Muir, D, , National Water Research Institute, Burlington, Canada, 
 
CLIMATE CHANGE INTERACTIONS WITH METAL UPTAKE AND STRESS PHYSIOLOGY OF LAND-LOCKED ARCTIC CHAR
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This multi-year study in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago aimed to elucidate the interactions between intra- and inter-annual variation in lake water temperature, the uptake in non-anadromous Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) populations of metals (cadmium, lead, zinc), induction of biochemical stress indicators (metallothionein, glutathione, glutathione disulfide, riboflavin, Vitamin-C) and energy status (liver and circulating glycogen levels). In 1998, higher than normal summer-time lake water temperatures and a longer ice-free period were accompanied by a clear physiological response of the fish studied. Both the concentration of metals (cadmium, zinc) in fish liver or kidney and metal-induced stress levels were significantly higher in August of 1998 when compared to the same period during the colder years 1997, 1999 to 2001. Concentrations of Cd in the liver were positively correlated with the mean summer air temperatures at the sampling site. Results will be explored in terms of lake temperature controls on metal bioaccumulation, otolith microchemistry, and the fitness of high latitude non-anadromous fish populations.