SS2.06 Microbial Diversity in Time and Space
Date: Tuesday, June 11, 2002
Time: 11:45:00 AM
Location: Lecture Theatre
 
LawrenceJE, Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, lawrence@ocgy.ubc.ca
Frederickson, C, M, Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, cindyf@interchange.ubc.ca
Short, S, M, Botany, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, smshort@interchange.ubc.ca
Suttle, C, A, Earth and Ocean Sciences, Botany, and Microbiology and Immunology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada, csuttle@eos.ubc.ca
 
INTERROGATING MARINE SEDIMENTS TO EXAMINE HISTORICAL VIRIOPLANKTON DIVERSITY
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Marine sediments may be important environmental reservoirs for virioplankton, and provide historical accounts of temporal and spatial dynamics of viruses and their hosts. To explore this we extracted pore-water from sediments collected in the Strait of Georgia, British Columbia and adjacent inlets and used various molecular approaches to examine genetic diversity within the virus-size fraction. Genome size was examined using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and showed a diversity of viruses between sites and over depth. To detect viruses that are not endemic to sediments, such as those produced by obligate phototrophs, we used eukaryotic algal virus and cyanophage specific PCR primers. Algal virus and cyanophage gene fragments were detected from the majority of samples tested. These findings indicate the utility of sediments for providing a historical record of viral diversity.