SS3.08 Application of Automated Technology to Detect Environmental Change
Date: Thursday, June 13, 2002
Time: 11:15:00 AM
Location: View Royal
 
GlasgowHB, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, USA, howard_glasgow@ncsu.edu
Reed, R, E, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, USA, rereed@unity.ncsu.edu
Burkholder, J, M, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, USA, joann_burkholder@ncsu.edu
 
REAL-TIME REMOTE MONITORING AND DATA ACQUISITION, AN INTEGRATIVE MANAGEMENT TOOL USING GIS AND WEB BASED REPORTING
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Recent advances in real-time, land/water based remote monitoring (RTRM) and data acquisition technologies have provided the tools that have been critically needed to establish relationships between water quality decline and watershed nonpoint pollu-tant loadings from agriculture and urbanization. These technologies have greatly strengthened temporal and spatial assessment of chronic as well as acute impacts of nonpoint-source nutrient delivery (via surface waters and groundwater) to receiving estuaries. In addition, we can now define nonpoint inputs at an increasingly higher resolution (sub-watershed level), enabling evaluation of the response of receiving waters to land use changes. For example, with a network of 11 RTRM stations on the Neuse Estuary, in ongoing research we are using real-time data management (RDTM) to integrate >20 physical, chemical and biological parameters into GIS data layers. The information is immediately accessible to stakeholders through existing web-based access. Using RTRM and RDTM technologies, we are also tracking chronic impacts of nutrient loadings from land use practices, toward the ultimate endpoint of improved management recommendations for nutrient reduction at water-shed and sub-watershed levels.