SS3.03 Recent Advances in Coastal and River Plume Remote Sensing
Date: Thursday, June 13, 2002
Time: 4:00:00 PM
Location: View Royal
 
MorrisJT, Dept. Biological. Sci., Univ. South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA, morris@sc.edu
Herrick, G, , Dept. Biological. Sci., Univ. South Carolina, Columbia, USA, 
Herr, J, , Dept. Biological. Sci., Univ. South Carolina, Columbia, USA, 
 
NUTRITIONAL STATUS AND SPECTRAL REFLECTANCE OF SPARTINA ALTERNIFLORA
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The spectral reflectance of plant canopies is determined by a variety of characteristics that vary in response to environmental conditions. A long-term, N-P factorial fertilization experiment in a South Carolina salt marsh has shown that Spartina biomass and productivity respond to N, but not to singular additions of P. Results of scanning with a spectroradiometer showed that P-treated plants had significantly higher reflectance in the NIR, irrespective of N treatment, in a spectral region that is largely determined by cell structure. Microscopic analysis showed that the bundle cells of P-treated plants were more lignified and also differed in the dimensions of their bundle sheaths. The observed differences in spectral reflectance should be great enough to be detectable by remote sensors and could provide a means of monitoring nutritional status.