SS1.08 Sensory Ecology, Neurophysiology and Behavior of Zooplankton
Date: Monday, June 10, 2002
Time: 3:45:00 PM
Location: Carson B
 
BundyMH, Academy of Natural Sciences Estuarine Research Center, St. Leonard, MD, USA, bundy@acnatsci.org
Vanderploeg, H, A, NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Laboratory, Ann Arbor, MI, USA, vanderploeg@glerl.noaa.gov
 
CALANOID COPEPODS INCREASE PREY DETECTION AND CAPTURE SUCCESS BY LINKING SWIMMING AND SINKING PATTERNS WITH FEEDING CURRENT FLOW FIELDS
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Calanoid copepods exhibit complex swimming behaviors that, along with morphological characteristics, determine feeding current geometry and velocity. Here, we document the use of mechanoreception by Skistodiaptomus oregonensis, as it attacks and captures artificial prey entrained in the feeding current. Published hydrodynamic models are utilized to support the hypotheses that these calanoids utilize an expansive feeding current and directed swimming to reduce risk of detection by prey, and use wake capture while sinking to increase the volume searched. Mechanoperception of remotely located prey entrained in a far-reaching feeding current is an energy efficient strategy compared to chemoperception. However, while an expansive feeding current is effective in non-turbulent regimes, in turbulent environments, a far-reaching, low velocity feeding current should be effective only if coupled with behaviors that quickly minimize separation distances once prey is detected. The results of this study show how copepod swimming and sinking behavior, coupled with a low velocity feeding current, not only can increase copepod encounter rates by increasing direct contact rates, but also can increase the probability of detecting and capturing prey in turbulent and non-turbulent environments.