SS1.02 Geochemical Tracers in Calcified Structures: Implications for Fisheries Research
Date: Tuesday, June 11, 2002
Time: 3:15:00 PM
Location: Carson A
 
WarnerRR, Dept. Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, Univ. of Calif., Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, USA, warner@lifesci.ucsb.edu
Swearer, S, E, Dept. Zoology, Univ. of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia, sswearer@unimelb.edu.au
Caselle, J, E, Dept. Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, Univ. of Calif., Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, USA, caselle@lifesci.ucsb.edu
Sheehy, M,  , Dept. Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, Univ. of Calif., Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, USA, sheehy@lifesci.ucsb.edu
Standish, J, , Dept. Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, Univ. of Calif., Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, USA, standish@lifesci.ucsb.edu
Zacherl, D, , Dept. Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology, Univ. of Calif., Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, USA, zacherl@lifesci.ucsb.edu
Paradis, G, , Dept. Geological Sciences, Univ. of Calif., Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, USA, glp@geosci.geol.ucsb.edu
 
GEOGRAPHIC STRUCTURE IN PRE-RELEASE LARVAL ELEMENTAL SIGNATURES FOR FISH AND INVERTEBRATES
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A major goal of marine ecology is to delineate the paths that pelagic larvae might take from their benthic sources to the sites where they will spend the rest of their lives. The degree of retention and the strength of connections between populations remain as the principal unmeasured parameters in models of marine population dynamics. If microchemical signatures laid down in hard, retained structures in larvae are to be used to trace their paths back to sources, then sources must be geographically distinguishable. Larval organisms that can be geographically characterized by elemental signatures prior to release into pelagic life are the best candidates for these studies. We report here on several open-coast species that show distinct local signatures in the otoliths and statoliths of larvae in pre-parturition females and benthic egg masses, often over small geographic distances. This is encouraging news for building an “atlas” of potential source populations. The technical challenge is to estimate the temporal stability of such an atlas, and to develop techniques and statistics to assign recruits to potential sources.