SS4.10 Interdisciplinary Contributions to the Maintenance of the Integrity of Aquatic Ecosystems
Date: Tuesday, June 11, 2002
Time: 2:45:00 PM
Location: Colwood
 
ChuenpagdeeR, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Gloucester Point, USA, ratana@vims.edu
 
INTEGRATING PUBLIC JUDGMENTS AND SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE INTO AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS MANAGEMENT
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Recognizing the importance of involving general public in the management of natural resources, many government agencies adopt various mechanisms to encourage such participation, ranging from public hearing to focused-group meeting. These mechanisms do not always bring fruitful results, as they are often neither inclusive nor transparent. Further, the inputs from the general public are not easily incorporated in the management framework, especially if they depart from scientific agreement. The method described in this paper, the 'damage schedule', aims to elicit judgments about important issues related to the health of aquatic ecosystems, from all stakeholder groups, including resource users, scientists, managers, environmental groups, and general public, by presenting these issues one pair at a time. A resulting interval scale indicates the ranking of relative importance of these issues, in accord with the judgments of each stakeholder group. When used as inputs for discussion at community workshops, the scale will facilitate further understanding between stakeholder groups, leading to successful management of aquatic resources. Applications of the damage schedule approach in diverse aquatic resource settings, such as Mexico, Thailand and USA, are presented.