SS1.01 Assessing Potential Environmental Impacts of Aquaculture
Date: Thursday, June 13, 2002
Time: 3:00:00 PM
Location: Lecture Theatre
 
MacleodCK, TAFI-University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia, c.macleod@utas.edu.au
Forbes, S, , TAFI-University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia, s.forbes@utas.edu.au
Volkman, J, , CSIRO-Marine Research, Hobart, Australia, john.volkman@csiro.au
Revill, A, , CSIRO-Marine Research, Hobart, Australia, andy.revill@csiro.au
Holdsworth, D, , CSIRO-Marine Research, Hobart, Australia, dan.holdsworth@csiro.au
Burke, C, , TAFI-University of Tasmania, Launceston, Australia, c.burke@utas.edu.au
Bissett, A, , TAFI-University of Tasmania, Launceston, Australia, a.bissett@utas.edu.au
 
A MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH FOR EVALUATION AND MANAGEMENT OF RECOVERY PROCESSES IN SEDIMENTS ASSOCIATED WITH MARINE FINFISH CULTURE IN TASMANIA, AUSTRALIA.
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Marine finfish culture is an economically important and growing industry in Australia. However, organic enrichment of the underlying sediments has potential to affect both farm production and aquatic ecosystem health. To overcome this farmers currently fallow areas of seabed to facilitate recovery. The present study was initiated by both industry and regulators and represents an integrated chemical and biological assessment of sediment conditions associated with cage fallowing. The project aims to enhance understanding of the rate and extent of change associated with sediment recovery and to identify any management practices or other factors which might influence recovery rates. Having commenced in January 2001 this project will monitor two complete farm production cycles at replicated sites over three years. Initial results have identified relationships between the benthic and microbial ecology and associated changes in the physico-chemical parameters. Although the physical environment and ecology of the sites differ, the response to organic enrichment has been similar. Benthic communities adjusted over time and with distance from the cages. Vitamin and sterol levels at cage sites reflected farm inputs and changing infaunal community structure.