CS26 Organic Carbon Dynamics
Date: Thursday, June 13, 2002
Time: 11:15:00 AM
Location: Carson C
 
AmonetteRN, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, USA, ramonet@pop3.utoledo.edu
Neely, R, K, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI, USA, Bob.Neely@emu.edu
Kuehn, K, , Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI, USA, Kevin.Kuehn@emu.edu
Sinsabaugh, R, L, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, USA, Robert.Sinsabaugh@utoledo.edu
 
DIVERSITY, REDUNDANCY AND EFFICIENCY IN MICROBIAL DECOMPOSITION OF CATTAIL LITTER
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The decomposition of Typha supports much of the decomposer food web in many freshwater wetlands. Our objective is to describe the contributions of bacteria, fungi and algae, in terms of biomass, production and diversity, to the efficiency of decomposition, as measured by mass loss, respiration, DOM production and extracellular enzyme activity. Litter bags were placed within mesh enclosures in two contrasting wetlands; the enclosures are subject to five sedimentation treatments. In the first year, the two sites were similar in terms of mass loss (ca. 35%), respiration (ca. 0.6 mmol/d/g), and bacterial production (ca. 10 micromol/d/g). But, fungal production, algal production and extracellular enzyme activities were an order of magnitude higher in the seasonally dry site compared to the continuously inundated site. The results show that microdecomposer communities vary widely in composition and dynamics and that this variation affects the fate and mobility of carbon within the ecosystem.