SS4.04 The Relevance of Gelatinous Zooplankton to Interdisciplinary Linkages
Date: Friday, June 14, 2002
Time: 11:15:00 AM
Location: Saanich
 
FordMD, NOAA/NESDIS, Silver Spring, USA, Michael.D.Ford@noaa.gov
MacLean, S, A, NOAA/NMFS/NEFSC, Narragansett, USA, 
Prezioso, J, , NOAA/NMFS/NEFSC, Narragansett, USA, 
 
SALPIDAE AND THALIACEA ON THE U.S. NORTHEAST CONTINENTAL SHELF
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Salps (Tunicata, Thaliacea) are planktivorous feeders. High feeding clearance rates suggest they may significantly impact some ecosystems. Other investigations of the impacts of predators such as ctenophores show the number of predators relate negatively to the number of fish eggs and larvae and of zooplankton (Shiganova, 1998). Densities of salps (enumerated as Salpidae and Thaliacea) have been determined from an approximately 24-year time series, from 1977 to the present, measured by Bongo net tows. Monthly, the highest concentrations of salps occurred between July and November. The study area was divided into four regions (Middle Atlantic Bight, Southern New England, Georges Bank, Gulf of Maine). A meridional trend was revealed with higher concentrations in the southern regions. We found several events of extreme salp concentration throughout this time series. Some events had peak salp concentrations of ~10000 specimens per cubic meter. These events were punctuated by several years of very low salp abundance in the late 80's and early 90's. Correlation to physical oceanographic measurements and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) Index was explored.