SS3.08 Application of Automated Technology to Detect Environmental Change
Date: Thursday, June 13, 2002
Time: 10:00:00 AM
Location: View Royal
 
ScholinC, MBARI, Moss Landing, USA, scholin@mbari.org
Marin, III, R, , MBARI, Moss Landing, USA, maro@mbari.org
Doucette, G, , National Marine Fisheries, Charleston, USA, greg.doucette@noaa.gov
Massion, G, , MBARI, Moss Landing, USA, magene@mbari.org
Jensen, S, , MBARI, Moss Landing, USA, sjensen@mbari.org
Roman, B, , MBARI, Moss Landing, USA, brent@mbari.org
Cline, D, , MBARI, Moss Landing, USA, dcline@mbari.org
 
REMOTE, IN SITU DETECTION OF HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOM SPECIES USING THE ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLE PROCESSOR (ESP)
image
Difficulties in collecting water samples at multiple locations routinely and synoptically often hinder efforts to understand mechanisms driving the formation of harmful algal blooms (HABs) and environmental factors modulating toxin production. The Environmental Sample Processor (ESP)is an experimental instrument designed to overcome some of these limitations. The ESP collects discrete water samples remotely and autonomously, and concentrates microorganisms contained within those samples onto filter disks. Automated, subsurface (if desired)application of preservatives and DNA (or other) probes enables archival,identification, and quantification of species captured. In addition to archiving discrete samples for nucleic acid, microscopic, and toxin analyses, the instrument can also transmit in real-time the results of DNA probe array-based assays conducted onboard to a remote location for data processing and interpretation. The concepts on which the ESP are based take advantage of similarities in sample handling and processing protocols used to detect intact organisms as well as molecules indicative of specific organisms.