SS4.05 Tribute to Thomas Frost
Date: Monday, June 10, 2002
Time: 4:30:00 PM
Location: Sidney
 
AdrianR, IGB, Berlin, Germany, Adrian@igb-berlin.de
Blenckner, T, , Erken Laboratory, Norr Malma, Sweden, Thorsten.Blenckner@ebc.uu.se
Livingstone, D, M, EAWAG, Dübendorf, Switzerland, living@eawag.ch
 
LAKE ECOSYSTEM RESPONSES TO CLIMATE CHANGE: SYNCHRONIZING VERSUS DESYNCHRONIZING FACTORS
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The responses of European lakes to meteorological forcing can be synchronized by large-scale climatic fluctuations such as the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The recent positive phase of the NAO has been associated with elevated winter and spring lake surface water temperatures. Observed quasi-simultaneous advances in the timing of lake ice break-up in southern Sweden, north-eastern Germany, Switzerland, and even Lake Baikal/Siberia are also likely to be due to shifts in the NAO. NAO-related early ice break-up in Lake Erken (Sweden) and Müggelsee (Germany) has induced earlier and more pronounced algal spring blooms. Despite strong evidence for the large-scale synchronization of processes among lakes exposed to the influence of the NAO, the magnitude of this synchronization is modulated by site-specific factors. Specifically, it has been found that the NAO influence on the temperature profiles of lakes in north-eastern Germany varied substantially according to the heat-storage capacity of the lakes. In addition, the degree of NAO influence on lake surface temperature in mountain regions may be altitude-dependent, decreasing as the timing of break-up of lake ice becomes later and later with increasing elevation.