SS3.14 An Interdisciplinary Journey Towards Integrated Aquatic Sciences: Homage to Jacob Kalff
Date: Thursday, June 13, 2002
Time: 11:00:00 AM
Location: Saanich
 
JacksonMJ, Department of Forest Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, acroloxus@dccnet.com
Sayer, C, D, Environmental Change Research Centre (ECRC), University College London, London, United Kingdom, c.sayer@ucl.ac.uk
Waldock, M, J, The Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS), Burnham-on-Crouch, Essex, United Kingdom, m.j.waldock@cefas.co.uk
Simpson, G, L, Environmental Change Research Centre (ECRC), University College London, London, United Kingdom, gavin.simpson@ucl.ac.uk
Boyle, J, F, Department of Geography, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom, jfb@liv.ac.uk
Jones, J, I, School of Biological Sciences, Queen Mary, University of London, London, United Kingdom, j.i.jones@qmv.ac.uk
Appleby, P, G, Environmental Radioactivity Research Centre, Dept. of Mathematical Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom, appleby@liv.ac.uk
Reed , J, , The Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS), Burnham-on-Crouch, Essex, United Kingdom, j.reed@cefas.co.uk
Perrow, M, R, ECON, School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom, m.perrow@uea.ac.uk
James, R, , School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom, b.james@uea.ac.uk
 
ECOTOXICOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF ANTIFOULING PAINTS IN SHALLOW LAKES: A MECHANISM TO ACCOUNT FOR SWITCHING BETWEEN ALTERNATIVE STABLE STATES?
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Over the last century, many of the world’s shallow lakes have switched abruptly from clear water dominated by submerged macrophytes to turbid water dominated by phytoplankton. Recent theory suggests that these two situations represent alternative stable states, but mechanisms that might induce the rapid shift between them are poorly understood. Many of the Norfolk Broads, a series of shallow lakes in Eastern England, U.K. underwent such a transition during the 1960s. We show that boat antifouling paints containing tributyltin (TBT) may have triggered the widespread loss of submerged macrophytes from the Broads system. Historical inter-comparisons of aquatic macroinvertebrate communities suggest that TBT might have induced the switch through the elimination of several species known to enhance submerged plant growth. Our palaeolimnological evidence challenges the previous assumption that use of TBT post-dated major ecological changes. Based on available TBT toxicity data, we provide a potential mechanism to account for the progressive dysfunction of a shallow-lake ecosystem. Our findings highlight an urgent need to consider the potential de-stabilising effects of toxic contaminants in shallow lakes and other freshwater ecosystems around the world.