SS3.16 Lentic-Lotic Linkages in Freshwaters: Comparisons from Different Ecosystems
Date: Monday, June 10, 2002
Time: 2:30:00 PM
Location: Colwood
 
KLINGGW, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA, gwk@umich.edu
 
LANDSCAPE MASS BALANCE AND THE COUPLING OF PROCESSES IN LAKES AND STREAMS
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One of the principles of ecological investigations is that most descriptors of a system vary with the spatial or temporal scale of measurement. In studies of temporal dynamics, organisms are considered to adapt and evolve, and characteristics of the environment are considered to change through time. However, in studies across various spatial scales, organisms and environmental characteristics are usually considered to be static; that is, there is little change or 'processing' that occurs as materials and organisms move across the landscape. This idea is inconsistent with empirical results from a series of connected streams and lakes in the Arctic. The results indicate that the consistent and directional (downslope) processing of materials produces spatial patterns that are coherent over time for many limnological variables. Ideas from stream, lake, and landscape ecology are used to develop a conceptual view of landscape mass balance; this view highlights that concepts related to the functioning of aquatic ecosystems within a landscape can be placed in a broader theoretical context by including the spatially-dependent processing of materials in lakes and streams taken together.