SS1.08 Sensory Ecology, Neurophysiology and Behavior of Zooplankton
Date: Monday, June 10, 2002
Time: 2:15:00 PM
Location: Carson B
 
WaggettRJ, University of Texas Marine Science Institute, Port Aransas, USA, waggett@utmsi.utexas.edu
Buskey, E, J, University of Texas Marine Science Institute, Port Aransas, USA, buskey@utmsi.utexas.edu
 
BIOMECHANICAL PARAMETERS OF COPEPOD ESCAPE BEHAVIOR IN RESPONSE TO A VISUAL PREDATOR
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To evaluate the escape behavior of calanoid copepods, two similarly sized species, Paracalanus parvus and Temora turbinata, were exposed to a hemisessile predator, the blenny Acantheblemaria spinosa. Encounter rates and attack frequencies for the two species were comparable, yet P. parvus displayed a greater ability to escape a blenny attack. The success of a copepod escape response results from the integration of several parameters including response threshold and latency, and the kinetics of the escape jump – speed, direction and distance. To identify the parameter(s) responsible for the increased escape success of P. parvus, predator-prey interactions were recorded using both standard and high-speed videographic techniques. Sensitivity testing consisted of mapping the locations of initial escape reactions in response to a siphon-generated flow field. Motion analysis of copepod escape responses provides information on the speed, acceleration, jump distance and direction of response, facilitating the determination of the parameter(s) responsible for the disparity between the species escape success.