SS1.07 Ecological Links to Population Dynamics and Productivity of Salmon
Date: Thursday, June 13, 2002
Location: Poster Session - VCC
 
SweetmanJN, Paleoecological Environmental Assessment and Research Lab (PEARL), Dept. Biology, Queen's University, Kingston, Canada, sweetman@biology.queensu.ca
Finney, B, P, Institute of Marine Science, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, USA, finney@ims.uaf.edu
Smol, J, P, Paleoecological Environmental Assessment and Research Lab (PEARL), Dept. Biology, Queen's University, Kingston, CANADA, smolj@biology.queensu.ca
 
A PALEOLIMNOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPACTS OF CLIMATE ON FRESHWATER ECOSYSTEMS IN THE NORTH PACIFIC WITH IMPLICATION FOR SALMON NURSERY LAKES
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There has been growing recognition that large-scale changes in the coupled atmosphere-oceanic system of the North Pacific (the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, PDO) can have a strong impact on the interdecadal variability of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, and can have significant effects on biological production. The impact of the PDO on biological communities, however, may vary within a region due to spatial and temporal variability in the strength of the PDO signal as well as due to geophysical factors affecting the propagation of the climatic signal. Because historical climate data are extremely limited for much of the North Pacific region, assessing the impacts of climate oscillations on ecosystems is difficult. Here we outline a paleolimnological study using chironomid remains and isotopic geochemistry to provide past climate records and thus help elucidate the impact of large-scale climate forcing on freshwater ecosystems. Results from Lake 445, a small, shallow, closed basin lake located on Kodiak Island, Alaska will be presented and compared to recent paleorecords of sockeye salmon abundance.