SS3.15 Physical Forcing and Pelagic-Benthic Interactions in Aquatic Systems
Date: Thursday, June 13, 2002
Time: 4:15:00 PM
Location: Oak Bay
 
ParslowJS, CSIRO Marine Research, Hobart, Australia, John.Parslow@csiro.au
Herzfeld, M, , CSIRO Marine Research, Hobart, Australia, Mike.Herzfeld@csiro.au
Webster, I, , CSIRO Land and Water, Canberra, Australia, Ian.Webster@csiro.au
Sakov, P, V, CSIRO Marine Research, Hobart, Australia, Pavel.Sakov@csiro.au
Walker, S, , Australian Research Council, Canberra, Australia, stephen.walker@arc.gov.au
Andrewartha, J, , CSIRO Marine Research, Hobart, Australia, John.Andrewartha@csiro.au
 
MODELLING CARBON AND NITROGEN CYCLING IN THREE CONTRASTING COASTAL WATER BODIES
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Integrated physical and biogeochemical models have been developed and analysed as part of major environmental studies in three contrasting coastal water bodies in south-eastern Australia. Port Phillip Bay is a large, shallow, vertically-mixed coastal water body, with a long flushing time (about 1 year), subject to large waste-water nutrient loads. Gippsland Lakes consists of a set of linked shallow lagoons, subject to large but highly intermittent catchment flows and nutrient loads, which result in persistent stratification. The Derwent estuary is a salt wedge estuary, with persistent flow and stratification and short flushing times, subject to catchment and point source nutrient and organic carbon loads. Model results and interpretation are compared and contrasted across these systems. While differences in stratification and flushing rate are important, the fate and impact of nutrient and carbon loads in all three systems depend critically on coupling and feedback between pelagic and benthic biogeochemical processes.