SS1.07 Ecological Links to Population Dynamics and Productivity of Salmon
Date: Friday, June 14, 2002
Time: 8:30:00 AM
Location: Lecture Theatre
 
SchindlerDE, Zoology, U. Washington, Seattle, USA, deschind@u.washington.edu
Scheuerell, M, D, Zoology, U. Washington, Seattle, USA, 
Moore, J, W, Zoology, U. Washington, , USA, 
Hilborn, R, ., Aquatic Sciences and Fisheries-U. Washington, , USA, 
Quinn, T, P, Aquatic Sciences and Fisheries-U. Washington, , USA, 
Leavitt, P, R, Biology, U. Regina, Regina, Canada, 
St. Louis, V, L, Biological Sciences, U. Alberta, Edmonton, Canada, 
 
CLIMATE, MARINE-DERIVED NUTRIENTS, AND FISHERIES AS DRIVERS OF PACIFIC SALMON POPULATION DYNAMICS
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Despite the escalating richness of data describing the biology of Pacific salmon, management of this culturally and economically valuable resource has changed little in the last few decades. Conflicting evidence about the importance of climate, density-dependence, and marine-derived nutrients (to name a few examples) has contributed to the confusion over identifying the key drivers of salmon population dynamics relevant to management. The vast diversity of life history strategies within and among salmon species has allowed them to flourish in a spectacular variety of habitats, and thus, local context has key effects on dynamics of any individual population. The importance of salmon spawning migrations as sources of nutrients, energy and contaminants to coastal ecosystems further complicates management objectives to include the keystone effects of salmon in an ecosystem context. We will provide an overview of examples where substantial progress has been made in these areas.