Pustizzi, F. University of Delaware REU, pustizzi@genius.rider.edu

 
THE EFFECTS OF LIGHT AND ORGANIC CARBON ON THE GROWTH OF THE BROWN TIDE ORGANISM AUREOCOCCUS ANAPHAGEFFERENS
 
In 1985 a picoplankton chryosphyte Aureococcus anophagefferens caused what became known as a brown tide bloom in Long island embayments of New York, with concurrent occurrences in Narangansett Bay, Rhode Island and Barnegat Bay, New Jersey. The brown tide has since plagued Long Island annually, causing much damage to local economies there. Several conditions have been linked to the initiation of brown tide blooms. Among them, brown tide organisms may be capable of taking in organic nutrients heterotrophically and may tolerate low light levels, two advantages that may aid in its dominance during blooms. This study investigates the effect of light and organic carbon on the growth of A. anophagefferens using a series of treatments of organic carbon and light. The results of these experiments indicate that organic carbon does stimulate the growth of A. anophagefferens for a short period of time. The organism also is capable of maintaining relatively high growth rates at low light levels, possibly giving it a competitive advantage over other organisms in light limiting conditions. The results of this study also indicate that the organism may have a requirement for the materials produced by other organisms, as had been suggested in previous studies.
 
Day: Wednesday, Feb. 3
Time: Poster
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: SS54WE1543S