Carroll, A. L.. University of Rhode Island REU, alc5@acpub.duke.edu
, . L.. ,

 
ANALYSIS OF BACTERIAL CARBON PARTITIONING AND THE IMPLICATIONS ON THE OCEANIC CARBON CYCLE
 
Increased levels of atmospheric C02 due to anthropogenic activities has led to widespread concern about global warming. Much emphasis is being placed on understanding the response of the ocean to these increases. Within this major reservoir, bacteria are the most important consumers of organic carbon. The bacterial partitioning of organic carbon between respiration of C02 and biomass production is a controlling factor for carbon budgeting in the ocean. However, little is known about bacterial growth efficiencies. Most studies have based the determination of growth efficiencies on measurements of bacterial growth and estimates of respiration, producing traditional estimates of 50%. This study determined growth efficiencies by measuring bacterial growth with epifluorescence microscopy and measuring respiration with a respirometer. Growth efficiencies ranging from 18.3 to 27.1% were found. Such efficiencies differ from the traditional estimates and agree with more recent research. The dependence of growth efficiency on species composition and temperature was examined, with little variation being found. A mixed response was found for the dependence of bacterial carbon demand (growth + respiration) on species composition and temperature. The differences in bacterial carbon demand among species were minimized at elevated temperatures.
 
Day: Wednesday, Feb. 3
Time: Poster
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: SS54WE1532S