Bivens, J. R. The University of Southern Mississippi, jbivens@sunfish.ssc.usm.edu

 
INTENSIVELY LEARNING OPTICAL OCEANOGRAPHY: MEASURING AND MODELING KD: HOW DO YOU GET FROM IOPS TO AOPS?
 
During the summer Friday Harbor Optical Oceanography class, 1998, an extensive in situ optical data set was collected in the Puget Sound area. Data from these sites have been analyzed with respect to the relationships between the downward diffuse vertical attenuation coefficient, Kd, and the inherent optical properties, IOPs. Coupled with data analysis, radiative transfer equations have led to several commonly used expressions for relating Kd to the IOPS. One of the first empirically determined expressions was that of Wilson and Honey, 1979. This relationship relates Kd to the IOPs assuming negligible effects of the angular distribution of the light. Likewise, Zaneveld, 1985, theoretically defined a K function solely in terms of scattering and attenuation. Models that included the effects of angular distribution of the light field were Kirk's expression, 1984, derived from Monte Carlo simulations and the Hydrolight model. As expected, the predictive capability of these models was variable with wavelength. West Sound data indicates all models performed reasonably in the blue region of the spectrum. Models became less accurate with increasing wavelength, with the exception of Hydrolight which performed best in the green. Data from East Sound showed a lesser degree of accuracy all around.
 
Day: Thursday, Feb. 4
Time:
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: SS53TH1662S