Smith, E. A.. Old Dominion University, Department of Ocean, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Center for Coastal Physical Oceanography, lizsmith@ccpo.odu.edu
Alfultis, M. A.. United States Coast Guard Academy, Department of Science, MAlfultis@cga.uscg.mil
Kibler, S. Old Dominion University, Department of Ocean, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, skipler@odu.edu

 
STUDYING EARTH'S ENVIRONMENT FROM SPACE: APPLICATION OF SATELLITE IMAGERY FOR OCEAN AND EARTH SCIENCE INSTRUCTION
 
The earliest college-level exposure that an undergraduate receives to the ocean sciences is often in a large lecture class, particularly for non-science majors. Seldom does this static, qualitative format lend insight for introductory-level students into what it means to be a scientist. In addition, it is widely accepted that students learn best in a hands-on, inquiry-based approach to scientific discovery. However, the unavailability of quantitative teaching materials often limits the ability of an instructor to use this approach in the classroom. Studying Earth's Environment From Space is a NASA-sponsored project to produce a series of quantitative, computer-based exercises for use with data from the following sources: NOAA AVHRR, Nimbus-7 CZCS, TOPEX/Poseidon, and SSM/I. Using a modified version of NIH Image for the Macintosh to analyze actual satellite data, students are able to better understand ocean processes such as circulation, upwelling, primary production, and ocean/atmosphere coupling. Graphical plots, image math, and numerical comparisons are utilized to substantiate temporal and spatial trends in sea surface temperature, sea surface height, ocean color and ice concentration data, while at the same time boosting the student's quantitative skills.
 
Day: Thursday, Feb. 4
Time: Poster
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: SS53TH0840S