Lavrentyev, P. J. The University of Akron, peter3@uakron.edu
Gardner, W. J. The University of Texas Marine Science Institute, gardner@utmsi.utexas.edu
Cavaletto, J. F. NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, cavaletto@glerl.noaa.gov

 
SPATIAL PATTERNS OF MICROBIAL PLANKTON COMPOSITION AND NITROGEN CYCLING RATES DURING A MAJOR EPISODIC EVENT IN SOUTHERN LAKE MICHIGAN.
 
A pilot study of the composition and distribution of microbial plankton (bacteria, picocyanobacteria, nano- and microzooplankton) and of nitrogen cycling rates was conducted as a part of the multidisciplinary Episodic Event Great Lakes Experiment (EEGLE) aimed at examining the effects of a recurrent storm-driven coastal plume in southern Lake Michigan. Because of an unusually warm winter, the profound plume initiated in January and lasted through April, thus providing us with the opportunity to observe its effects on the early stages of the seasonal plankton succession. The microbial samples were collected from discrete depths along four transects representing gradients of turbidity off Muskegon, St. Joseph, Gary, and Chicago and are being enumerated. Near-surface ammonium cycling rates were not distinguishable from zero at either a plume station (uptake = 0.010 SE 0.033 uM/h; regeneration = -0.011 SE 0.006 uM/h) or at other stations (uptake = 0.006 SE 0.020 uM/h; regeneration = -0.004 SE 0.028 uM/h).
 
Day: Thursday, Feb. 4
Time: Poster
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: SS52TH0541S