Chaky, D. A. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, chakyd@rpi.edu
Chillrud, S. A. Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, chilli@ldeo.columbia.edu
Bopp, R. F. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, boppr@rpi.edu
Kroenke, A. E. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, kroena@rpi.edu
Shuster, E. L. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, shuste@rpi.edu
Walsh, D. C. New York State Dept of Environmental Conservation,
Estabrooks, F. D. New York State Dept of Environmental Conservation,

 
ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION OF ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS AND TRACE METALS IN THE NEW YORK CITY AREA: INSIGHTS FROM DATED SEDIMENT CORES
 
Analyses of dated sediment cores are used to define fluxes of organic contaminants and trace metals to three very different environments in the New York City area. Sediment cores collected in New York Harbor and Newark Bay preserve temporal trends of contaminant input from local industrial, wastewater, and urban combustion sources. Cores collected from Central Park Lake preserve a record of dominantly atmospheric flux to the urban environment, and cores collected from lakes ca. 50 miles north of NYC are indicative of regional atmospheric fluxes. Data from sections of the Central Park Lake cores and the NY/NJ Harbor cores yield estimates of the urban atmospheric contribution of dioxins, furans, and PCBs to the sediments of New York Harbor. The temporal histories of Pb, Zn, and Sn fluxes to the Central Park Lake cores closely mirror the history of municipal garbage incineration, and suggest that the use of leaded gasoline was only a minor contributor to the atmospheric lead flux in the NYC area. Mercury fluxes to the New York Harbor cores were much greater than the atmospheric flux derived from the Central Park cores and reveal the dominance of industrial sources in the western harbor.
 
Day: Wednesday, Feb. 3
Time: 10:45 - 11:00am
Location: Sweeney Center
 
Code: SS50WE1045S